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world war 1 military records of caost and geodetic survey personnel


Minor M. Coleman, Private, U.S. Army:

Served as a laborer in the Office of the Coast and Geodetic Survey from July 12, 1917, to September 15, 1917, when his resignation was accepted on account of his having been drafted into the military service of the United States. He was honorably discharged at Camp Shelby, Miss., on July 26, 1919.


Luther H. Conoly, Private, U.S. Army:

Served as a foreman, hand, with one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy until April 30, 1918, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Army as a private.


Cornelius N. Conover, Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F.:

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order No. 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer BACHE to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was Chief Engineer on the Steamer BACHE.

On October 19, 1917, he was enrolled as Lieutenant (j.g.) in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and was ordered to continue with his duties as Chief Engineer of the U.S.S. BACHE, in which capacity he served until November 16, 1918, when he was transferred to the Naval Sea Transportation Service, and on July 21, 1920, he was transferred to the U.S.S. TRINITY. At this date he is still in the active service of the Navy.

His chief duty during the period of the war was on board of the U.S.S. BACHE engaged in guard duty off Cape Henry, Va.


Thomas Cooke, Officer’s Steward, U. S. N. R. F.:

Transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer ISIS by Executive Order No. 2707 on September 24, 1917. He was enrolled in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and served on the U.S.S. ISIS as Officer’s Steward from September 24, 1917, until April 25, 1919 when he returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Guy H. Cooper, Private, U.S. Army:

Served as a reorder with one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy until August 20, 1918, where he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Army as a private.


Harold A. Cotton, Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F.:

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order No. 2707, he was transferred to the services and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned Junior hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer. Effective from the date of his transfer he was enrolled as Lieutenant (j.g.) in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and on March 8, 1919, he was promoted to Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F. He served on the U.S.S. BACHE as navigating Officer from September 24, 1917, to January 9, 1918, when he was assigned to the duty of Executive Officer until November 16, 1918, when he was assigned as Commanding Officer of the vessel, and he served in that capacity until the vessel was returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey, on June 20, 1919. For detailed information relating to services, reference is made to the activities of the U.S.S. BACHE referred to in another part of this report under the heading of “Vessels of the Coast and Geodetic Survey”.

He was detached from active duty with the U. S. N. R. F. on July 8, 1919, and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on July 10, 1919.


George D. Cowie, Captain, Coast Artillery Corps, U. S. A.:

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the services and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a Commissioned Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer.

Upon receipt of orders to report for duty at the Coast Artillery School he proceeded to Ft. Monroe, Va., on October 5, 1917, and entered the 2nd Training Camp as a student.

After completing the course at the school he volunteered for immediate service in France and sailed from New York on December 24, 1917, via Halifax, Liverpool and Southampton arriving at Le Havre, France, three weeks later.

Soon after arriving at the American Railway Artillery School at Mailly-le-camp, Marne, and after a month of inaction, he volunteered for duty as an Aerial Observer, eventually being attached for duty with Battery C, 52nd Railway Artillery then in camp at Haussimont, Marne.

While at this camp his duties consisted of infantry drill, gas drill, gun drill and school instructing.

In March he went with his Battery to St. Germaine, Neurtheote-Moselle, (Luneville Bacarrat Sector), and until July, 1918, was engaged in the construction of a large ammunition dump, light and standard gauge railways, and in gun drills with the large railway guns. During this time occasional excitement was added by German bombing planes, and enemy gun-fire when details were removing ammunition from positions beyond Luceville, but on the whole the sector was quiet.

During July and August he was with his outfit engaged on railway construction near Avrainville, north of Toul, on the spur-line tracks leading to large-railway gun positions for the St. Mihiel offensive. During this time the German bombers were particularly active.

In September he acted as Battalion orienteer and did survey and construction duty in connection with emplacing and firing the 15" railway guns on positions near Barnecourt and Neviant, and in the vicinity of Pont-a-Mousson, during the St. Mihiel offensive.

Following this he performed similar duty preceding and during the Meuse-Argonne offensive while his Battalion was in position near Verdun. During both of these engagements the enemy gun fire was fairly heavy causing considerable damage to the railway tracks and positions but fortunately little damage to the gun crews. By the middle of October, the American Forces having advanced considerably to the north of Verdun and the batteries in positions near Verdun being used only for desultory firing to the eastward of the Meuse River, he was sent with Battery C, 52nd. Artillery which he now commanded, to assist in rebuilding the railway line from Verdun toward Sedan. The battery after living in pup tents near the ruined village of Chattancourt finally managed to get comfortable billets in the old French dug-outs at Dead Man’s Hill, and remained there until after the Armistice was signed.

Following this he returned with his battery to Haussimont, Marne, put the guns in order for transfer back to the French Army and was then transferred to command of Battery F 42nd Artillery.

While waiting at Nantes and St. Nazaire for transportation to the states he acted as Commander of the 3rd Battalion, 42nd, during which time this battalion participated in formal ceremonies with the French, had the colors of Battery E decorated, and a number of men and officers awarded the Croix-de-Guerre and D.S.C.

At St. Nazaire he commanded a battalion escort of honor to General Pershing on the occasion of his visit to inspect the troops waiting for debarkation in January.

He left France late in January, served as Police Officer during the trip on the Transport Vreenland, arrived at Camp Stuart, Va., February 17th, and moved to Camp Eustis, Virginia a few days later.

From this time until he was honorably discharged on March 6, 1919, he was engaged in mustering out those of his Battery (Regular Coast Artillery Corps), whose periods of enlistment were completed.

He was discharged at Fort Monroe, Va., and reported on the following day to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


John W. Cox, Second Lieutenant, C. A. R. C., U. S. Army:

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order, 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned officer with the rank of Aid.

On October 3, 1917, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant, Coast Artillery Reserve Corps, U.S. Army, effective September 24, 1917, and was ordered to the Coast Artillery School, Fort Monroe, Va., for a course of instruction, where he arrived on October 4, 1917.

He remained at the school at the Second Coast Artillery Camp, at Fort Monroe until November 27, when he was ordered to Fort Caswell, N.C., of the Coast Defenses of the Cape Fear. Upon arrival there, he was assigned to the First Company, C.A.C. (Mine Co.) And he remained with that company during the term while stationed at Fort Caswell except for about one month during which time he was attached to the Sixth Company C. A. C.

On January 4, 1918, he was detailed by the Fort Commander for special duty under Capt. Wagner the Construction Quartermaster, for drawing plans in connection with construction work. He was relieved from this duty on February 1, and ordered to build a narrow gauge wooden railroad about three miles in length for use in hauling materials with mule drawn carts. For use in this work he had detailed to him thirty soldiers and also the necessary wagons and drivers.

Beginning about April 1, 1918, he took a ten weeks course in Heavy Artillery at Fort Caswell, and thereafter returned to the Mine Company, where he had training in planting and taking up wires, and while engaged in this work he also served as instructor in small boat drill.

On May 15, 1918, he was detailed for duty as Police and Prison Officer at Fort Caswell, and he served in this capacity until September 20, when he was detached and ordered to the Anti-Aircraft School at Fort Monroe, Va., for a course in Anti-Aircraft Fire. After completing this course he was assigned to an overseas unit at Camp Eustis, Va., the Eighth Anti-Aircraft Battalion, later changed to the Fifteenth A. A. Sector, but the Armistice was signed before arrangements for transportation had been completed and the battalion did not go overseas.

He was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on December 20, 1918, in accordance with Executive Order 3029.


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