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world war 1 military records of caost and geodetic survey personnel


John Rudolph Belcher, Second Lieutenant, Field Artillery Corps, U.S. Army:

Enlisted as a private in the Field Artillery Corps of the U.S. Army on January 15, 1918. Previous to his enlistment, he served as a rodman and recorder with one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey.

His first service with the U.S. Army was at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, and two months after his enlistment he was appointed First Sergeant in Company 1, of the First Corps of Artillery, Park.

On May 15, 1918, he sailed with his company for France and soon after arriving was sent to the front.

He was on continuous active duty at the front from May 26, 1918, to Sept 1918, and during this time he took part in three major offensive operations and was present in two defensive sectors.

On Oct. 1, 1918, he was relieved from active duty at the front and was sent to the American Officers Artillery Training School at Saumur, France.

In January 1919, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant, in the Field of Artillery Corps. After completing his course of instruction at Saumur he was returned to his company at Coblenz, Germany, where he remained as a member of the Army of Occupation until August 15, 1919, when his company was ordered back to the United States.

He was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army in Sept., 1919.

Joseph Warren Belcher, Corporal, Tank Corps, U.S. Army:

Enlisted as a private in the Tank Corps of the U.S. Army, at Gettysburg, Pa., on August 15, 1918. Previous to his enlistment he was a computer in the Office of the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

On Sept. 24, 1918, the company to which he was attached was ordered to France, and soon after arrival was sent to the Tank Corps Center at Langers.

In January, 1919, he was appointed Corporal and on March 2, he returned with his company to the United States.

Before his discharge, he was detailed to Richmond, Va., to take part in the drive for the Victory Liberty Loan, and after six weeks devoted to this work he was honorably discharged at Camp Meade, Md., on June 9, 1919. He returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on June 12, 1919.


Roland K. Bennett, Second Lieutenant U.S. Army Reserve Corps:

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order No. 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned officer with the rank of Aid.

Information regarding the activity of this officer was not placed on file previous to his resignation from the Coast and Geodetic Survey on May 1, 1919, while requests for further information from him received no response.

On November 15, 1917, information was received that he had passed the physical examination required for entrance into the Army and had been assigned to the 8th Training Co. U.S.R. at Fort Monroe as Second Lieutenant.
On May 28, 1918, information was received that he was Range Officer with the 2nd Company of Engineers, New York and was stationed at Fort Totten, New York. He was returned to the service and jurisdiction of the Coast and Geodetic Survey by Executive Order No. 3029, dated December 28, 1918.


Walter J. Bilby, Private, U.S. Marine Corps:

Served as a hand with one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy until May 20, 1918, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Marine Corps as a private.


Pabou Blas, Seaman, U.S. Navy:

Separated from the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer PATHFINDER, at Manila, Philippine Islands, on January 31, 1918, and enlisted with the U.S. Navy:


C.M. Bolles, Private, U.S. Army:

Served as a hand with a shore party operating under the Division of Hydrography and Topography until September 17, 1917, when he was drafted into the U.S. Army. On May 24, 1918, it was reported that he was at Camp Ayer, Mass.

Frank S. Borden, First Lieutenant, U.S. Army Reserve Corps:

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order No. 2707 he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned Junior Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer.

His first assignment was to the officers Training Camp at Fort Monroe, Va., for training in the Coast Artillery School.

On November 29, 1917, having completed his course at the training camp, he was ordered to duty at Fort Wright and served as Assistant Artillery Engineer and Assistant Ordnance Officer until August 20, 1918.

From August 20, 1918, until October 7, 1918, he was at Camp Eustis, Va., attached to Battery B, 48th Heavy Artillery as Commanding Officer of Battery B.

On October 7, 1918, he sailed from Norfolk, Va., with the 48th Heavy Artillery, arriving at Brest, France, on October 20, 1918, when he was detailed to the heavy artillery training camp at Angers for instruction as orienteer officer. After the armistice, he was ordered to rejoin the 48th Heavy Artillery as Commanding Officer of Battery B.

On February 1, 1919, he was ordered to return to the United States. On February 6, he sailed from Brest, arrived at New York on February 13, and on March 7, 1919, he was discharged from the U.S. Army at Camp Dix, N.J.

He was returned to the service and jurisdiction of the Coast and Geodetic Survey on March 9, 1919, in accordance with Executive Order No. 3044, dated February 26, 1919.

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