NOAA History Banner
gold bar divider
home - takes you to index page
about the site
contacts
noaa - takes you to the noaa home page
search this site
white divider
   
arrow A Nation at War
arrow World Wars
arrow WWI Records
 


world war 1 military records of caost and geodetic survey personnel


W. R. Aven, Jr., Private, U.S. Army:

Served as a hand with one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until November 15, 1917, when he separated from the party and entered the Aviation Corps of the U.S. Army.

Henry G. Avers, Failed to qualify physically:

In August, 1917, when a list of names was being prepared for recommendation for transfer to the service and jurisdiction of the war Department and Nab Department, Henry G. Avers, Geodetic Computer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey, was considered, but after a preliminary examination at the Public Health service, he was declared physically not qualified, and for that reason his name was not included in the list of those recommended for transfer with commissions.


A.W. Bacchus, Quartermaster, third class, U.S.N.R.F.:

Transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer BACHE, by Executive Order No. 2707, on September 24, 1917. He was enrolled in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and served on the U.S.S. BACHE as Quartermaster, third class, from September 24, 1917, until February 27, 1918.


A. W. Bales, Private, U.S. Army:

Served as a hand with one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy until December 6, 1917, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Army as a private.


Frank H. Bargmann, Chief Electrician (radio) U.S.N.R.F:

Transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer SURVEYOR, by Executive Order No. 2707, on September 24, 1917. He was enrolled in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and served on the U.S.S. SURVEYOR as Chief Electrician (radio) from September 24, 1917, until March 31, 1919, when the vessel was returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Stanley T. Barker, Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F.:

On September 24 , 1917, by Executive Order No. 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned Junior Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer.

On October 6, 1917, he was commissioned Lieutenant (j.g.) in class 3, U.S.N.R.F. and was assigned to Watch and Division Officer on the U.S.S. SURVEYOR. He was promoted to Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F. on August 27, 1918, and assigned to duty as Executive Officer and Navigator on the U.S.S. Surveyor. On February 28, 1919, he became Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. SURVEYOR until that vessel was returned to the service and jurisdiction of the Coast and Geodetic Survey on March 31, 1919.

Previous to being assigned to the command of the SURVEYOR he served under Lieutenant (later Lieutenant Commander) F.H. Hardy; Capt. Ralph E. Pope, U.S.N.; and Captain R.W. Dempwolf, U.S.C.G.

The SURVEYOR was engaged in convoy and escort duty in the Mediterranean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean and was attached to Squadron 2, Patrol Squadron based on Gibralter. During her service in the war she traveled over 26,000 miles, not counting the extra distance covered in zig-zagging, and she convoyed about 330 ships of which four were torpedoed, two being sunk.

The SURVEYOR took part in two submarine engagements, the first on May 11, 1918, when the UB 52 sank the French Steamship SUZETTE FRAISINETTE, and the second on May 17, 1918, when the U 39 together with another submarine sank the British Steamship MAVISBROOK and torpedoed the British Steamships SCULPTOR and ELSNICK GRANGE. In this second engagement, one of the two depth bombs dropped by the Surveyor damaged the U 39 so that it had to be towed into Cartagena, Spain and interned.


Harrison R. Bartlett, Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F.:

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order No. 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned Junior Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer and at the time of his transfer was attached to the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer PATTERSON located at Seattle, Washington.

He remained with the PATTERSON, under U.S. Navy assignment until February 21, 1918, when in accordance with orders he proceeded to the Bremerton Navy Yard and reported on board the U.S.S. NORTHERN PACIFIC for transportation to New York City. He arrived at New York City on March 17 and on that date was ordered to report to the Supervisor of Naval Auxiliary Reserve at that Place.
On March 21, 1918, he was assigned the duty of taking over the Dutch Steamer WEIRINGEN and remained in charge of this vessel for about one week when he was ordered as navigator to a former Dutch ship the U.S.S. VEENDYK, a vessel of 7,000 gross tons, 4,262 net tons and 10,550 dead weight tons.

The U.S.S. VEENDYK sailed from New York on April 17, 1918, put into Halifax for one week, sailed from Halifax on April 28, 1918, and proceeded in convoy to France. The convoy was once attacked off the Irish coast, but no losses were sustained and the voyage was completed without further incident.

After considerable delay the ship was unloaded and returned to the United States unescorted and without guns.

In July, 1918, the vessel left the United States on a second trip across the Atlantic and had
proceeded to within about 1,000 miles of the French coast when the convoy was attacked by submarines at twilight. The S. S. TIPPECANOE was sunk on this occasion. The vessel floated for twenty-five minutes after the attack and then sank stern first. All boats got away in good order and the survivors were rescued by destroyers on the next morning. This voyage was completed without further incident and the vessel returned to the United States about September 1, 1918.

Early in September, 1918, Lieutenant Bartlett went before the Local Inspectors at Baltimore, and his license was raised to Chief Mate of Ocean Vessels. Soon thereafter he was promoted to Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F. and was made Executive Officer of the U.S.S. VEENDYK.

The steamer made two more trips to France while he was attached to her, on one of which she carried 557 horses which were all landed safely.

He was detached from the VEENDYK on February 10, 1919, and after a short furlough was ordered to Washington, D.C., and on March 13, 1919, he was relieved from all active duty in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, having been returned to the service and jurisdiction of the Coast and Geodetic Survey in accordance with Executive Order No. 3044, dated February 26, 1919.


George L. Bean, Lieutenant (j.g.) U.S.N.R.F.:

On September 24 , 1917, by Executive Order No. 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned officer with the rank of Aid, and at the time of his transfer he was attached to the Field Station at Seattle, Washington.

On October 11, 1917, at Bremerton, Washington, he was enrolled as Ensign, U.S.N.R.F., effective upon the date of the Executive Order of September 24, 1917, and was temporarily assigned to the Coast and Geodetic Field Station at Seattle to await orders.

The latter part of February, 1918, he was ordered to report on board of the U.S.S.
NORTHERN PACIFIC for transportation to the Naval Supervisor’s Office at New York City. He arrived at New York City on March 17, 1918, and on that date reported for duty as ordered.

His first duty was in assisting in taking over one of the Dutch vessels then at New York.

On April 4, 1918, he was promoted to Lieutenant (j.g.) U.S.N.R.F. and was assigned as Navigating Officer to the U.S.S. SAMARINDA, Lieutenant Commander Geo. White, U.S.N.R.F., Commanding. He remained attached to that vessel until September 12, 1918, and made two voyages from New York to France with general cargo, touching at Brest, Saint Nazare, Nantes, La Palice, Bay de Quiberon and Gironne River. The SAMARINDA was a vessel of about 6300 gross tons and upon one voyage acted as Vice Commodore of Convoy.

About September 12, 1918, Lieutenant (j.g.) Bean, was detached from his vessel on account of sickness. The latter part of September, 1918, he attended the Anti-Submarine Warfare School at New London, Connecticut.

On October 2, 1918, he was attached to the U.S.S. TJIKENBANG, Lieutenant Commander C.W. Scott, U.S.N.R.F., Commanding and served as junior officer aboard that vessel while undergoing alterations, until October 23, 1919, when he was detached on account of loss of clothing.

On November 19, 1918, he was assigned the U.S.S. LUKENBACK, Lieutenant Commander Geo. Benner, U.S.N.R.F. Commanding. He served as Navigating Officer aboard this vessel until January 29, 1919, and made one voyage from New York to France with general cargo for Marseilles and Gibralter. The LUKENBACK was a vessel of 7,943 gross tons.

On February 13, 1919, he was relieved from all active duty and on March 1, 1919, was returned to the service and jurisdiction of the Coast and Geodetic Survey in accordance with Executive Order No. 3044, dated February 26, 1919.

- Top of Page -


Publication of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), NOAA Central Library.

Last Updated: June 8, 2006 9:24 AM

Privacy Policy | Disclaimer