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world war 1 military records of caost and geodetic survey personnel


Raymond A. Wheeler, First Lieutenant, C.A.C., U. S. Army:

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned Junior Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was enrolled in the U.S. Coast Artillery Reserve Corps with the rank of Second Lieutenant and on Oct. 18, 1917, he received orders from the Adjutant General of the U.S. Army to report at Fort Monroe, Va.

After completing his course of training at the Artillery School at Fort Monroe he proceeded with his regiment to France, where he was assigned for another course of training at the Army Heavy Artillery School.
No detailed information relating to his war activities have been placed on file in this office, but according to various letters received after completing his course at the Heavy Artillery School in France, in April, 1918, he was serving as Orientation Officer to some battery organization and on May 14, 1918, he was assigned to the Topographical Section of the Heavy Artillery Engineer Division, under Lieutenant Colonel Goethals.

He was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army at Camp Upton, New York, on January 31, 1919, with the rank of First Lieutenant, C.A.C., and he returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.

He resigned from the Coast and Geodetic Survey on Feb. 27, 1919.


Nelson Whidbee, Quartermaster, third class, U.S.N.R.F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer BACHE to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was Quartermaster on the BACHE.

There is no information on file at this office regarding whether or not he was enrolled in the U. S. Naval Reserve Force.


Paul C. Whitney, Lieutenant Commander, U.S.N.R.F.:

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707 he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer, and was in command of the Steamer BACHE which was also transferred by the same Executive Order.

He was enrolled as Lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, effective Sept. 24, 1917, and on Nov. 27, 1917, was officially assigned as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. BACHE, which during the period of his command was at the Norfolk Navy Yard undergoing repairs and being outfitted preparatory to assignment to active duty.

On Jan. 9, 1918, he was detached from the U.S.S. BACHE and was assigned as Assistant to Public Works Officer at the Naval Base, Virginia, engaged in very extensive water front construction in the vicinity of Hampton Roads and Norfolk. He continued upon this duty until Aug. 8, 1918, when he was detached and assigned as Naval Route Officer under the Captain of the Port of Norfolk. While serving in this capacity his duty was to route shipping in accordance with confidential information from the Department so as to reduce submarine hazard to a minimum. During the months of August and September, 1918, the work of the office was arduous and exacting requiring constant touch with all of the anti-submarine activities of the Navy.

He served as Naval Route Officer until Dec. 5, 1918, when he was detached and again assigned to the Naval Operating Base as the Commandant’s Representative on Water Front Operations and Captain of the Yard. On Jan. 22, 1919, he was promoted to Lieutenant Commander, U.S.N.R.F.

While with the U.S. Navy he served under Admiral A.G. Dillingham, U.S.N., Senior Captain J.G. Ballinger, U.S. Coast Guard and Admiral De Witt Coffman, U.S.N.

He was retired from active duty with the U.S. Navy on March 29, 1919, and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.


Leo C. Wilder, Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F.:

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned Officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey with the rank of Aid.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force. He was first assigned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer PATTERSON, for temporary duty, under Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer C.G. Quillian, of the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

On Feb. 21, 1918, he was assigned to the U.S.S. NORTHERN PACIFIC as Junior Watch Officer and for transportation to New York.

On March 29, 1918, he was promoted to Lieutenant (j.g.) in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, and was assigned to the U.S.S. RONDO as Navigating Officer, under Lieutenant Commander P.G. Grening, U.S.N.R.F., Commanding Officer.

The RONDO was engaged in transporting war materials and supplies from the United States to ports in France.

On Oct. 3, 1918, he was promoted to Lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and transferred to the U.S.S. WABASH as Executive Officer under Lieutenant Commander G.H. Sargent, U.S.N.R.F., Commanding Officer. This vessel was also engaged in transporting war materials to France.

On Feb. 16, 1919, he was relieved from all active duty with the U.S. Navy and on Feb. 25, 1919, he returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


J. M. Wilkey, U. S. N. R. F. (rank unknown):

On May 16, 1918, by Executive Order 2861, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer PATTERSON to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was Seaman on the PATTERSON.

There is no information available at this office regarding whether or not he was enrolled in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force.


Preston S. Williams, U. S. Army (rank unknown):

Served as Assistant plate Printer in the office of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until August 31, 1918, when he resigned and entered the U.S. Army.


Max O. Witherbee, Second Lieutenant, C.A.C., U. S. Army:

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey with the rank of Aid.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Reserve Corps of the U.S. Army, and on Oct. 1, he was ordered to the Second Officers Training Camp at Fort Monroe, Va. After completing his course of training he was ordered to overseas service, and arrived in France on Jan. 17, 1918.

From Feb. 1, 1918, to March 17, 1918, he was attending the Anti-Aircraft School near Paris and during a part of the time was receiving instructions at a French Anti-Aircraft Battery at the front near St. Mihiel. After completing this course of training on April 14, 1918, he was assigned to the 3rd Anti-Aircraft Battery at the front near Verdun, where he remained until May 31.

On June 1, 1918, the battery to which he was attached was ordered to Is-Sur-Tille to form part of the Anti-Aircraft defense of a supply depot at that place. He remained at this station until after the Armistice was signed.

He was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army at Fort Totten, New York, on March 21, 1919, and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.


Andrew C. Witherspoon, First Lieutenant, C.A.C., U.S. Army:

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey, with the rank of Aid.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Reserve Corps, and early in October, in accordance with orders from the War Department, he reported at the Second Officer’s Training Camp, at Fort Monroe, Va., where he was in training until the camp was closed on Nov. 30, 1917, when he was ordered to report to the Commanding Officer, Coast Defense of Baltimore at Fort Howard.

He reported at Fort Howard on Dec. 15, 1917 and was assigned to the 3rd Company of Baltimore C.A.C., in which he remained attached until June, 1918, when he was transferred to a Mine Company at the same place.

On June 15, 1918, he was promoted to First Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Corps of the National Army.

About July 15, 1918, he was transferred to the 74th Coast Artillery, which was being organized for overseas service and was assigned to Battery “E”, which was formed at Fort Howard.

On Sept. 10, 1918, the regiment went to Camp Upton. N.Y., where it was stationed until Sept. 22, where it embarked on the PRESIDENT GRANT and sailed for France on the following day, arriving at St. Nazaire on Oct. 7, 1918.

Soon thereafter, Lieutenant Witherspoon was sent to the training school for Orienteur Officers at Mailly and he remained there until the Armistice was signed. The regiment to which he was attached was ordered to Brest about two weeks after the signing of the Armistice and arrived at Hoboken, N.J., on Dec. 22, 1918.

He was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army at Fort Totten, N.Y., on January 10, 1919, and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.


A. Woolbert, U. S. N. R. F. (rank unknown):

On May 16, 1918, by executive Order 2861, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer PATTERSON to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was Assistant to Engineer, Second Class on the PATTERSON.

There is no information available at this office regarding whether or not he was enrolled in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force.


Clifford A. Wrenn, U.S.N.R.F. (rank unknown):

Served as clerk in the office of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until Oct. 26, 1917, when he resigned and entered the U.S. Army. He enlisted on Oct. 27, 1917, and served with the American Expeditionary Forces in France for eight months, attached to Headquarters Company, 368th infantry.

He was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army on March 7, 1919, and on April 1, 1919, he was reappointed as clerk in the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

On Oct. 28, 1919, he again resigned from the service and left no detailed information relating to his activities in the war.


C. N. Young, U. S. Army (rank unknown):

Served as Fireman on the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer PATTERSON until April 30, 1917, when he was discharged at his own request and entered the U.S. Army.


Adam Youngblood, U.S. Army (rank unknown):

Served as a hand with one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy, Coast and Geodetic Survey until May 21, 1918, when he separated from the party and entered the U. S. Army.


Robert M. Zeitlin, U.S.N.R.F. (rank unknown):

Served as a clerk in the office of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until Jan. 13, 1918, when he resigned and entered the U.S. Naval Reserve Force.


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