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world war 1 military records of caost and geodetic survey personnel


Frederick L. Peacock, Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707 he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned Junior Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was commissioned Lieutenant (j.g.) in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, and was assigned to duty on the U.S.S. ISIS, under Lieutenant Gilbert T. Rude, U.S.N.R.F., Commanding, until June 4, 1918, and later under Lieutenant Commander Edward Sherlock, U.S.N.R.F., Commanding.

The ISIS was assigned to the duty of Flagship to the Commander of Squadron 2, Cruiser Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, and Lieutenant (j.g.) Peacock served as Executive Officer of this vessel from Sept. 24, 1917, until Sept. 15, 1918, when he was detached and was directed to proceed to Washington, D.C. and report for duty at the U.S. Naval Observatory.

On Sept. 16, 1918, he reported to Rear Admiral F. B. Howard, U.S.N. Retired, Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Observatory and was assigned to duty as assistant to Lieutenant Commander W.E. Parker, U.S.N.R.F., Chief of Compass Office at the Observatory.

About Dec. 1, 1918, a compass school was inaugurated in connection with the Compass Office at the Naval Observatory, for the purpose of affording to navigators of Naval vessels an opportunity to review the theory of compass deviations and their compensation; and to afford practical experience in the compensation of compass deviations. On recommendation of the Chief of the Compass Office, Lieutenant (j.g.) Peacock was detailed as instructor in this school, and he continued to serve in that capacity for the remainder of his period of service with the Navy.

On Dec. 20, 1918, he was promoted to Lieutenant , U.S.N.R.F. He was relieved from active duty in the U.S. Navy on March 14, 1919, and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.

For further information see letter of March 4, 1919, from Rear Admiral T. B. Howard, U.S. N. Retired, which refers to the valuable services of Lieutenant Frederick L. Peacock and eight other officers of the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

Harold W. Pease, Second Lieutenant, C.A.O.R.C.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order, 2707 he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned officer of the Coast and Geodetic Survey with the rank of Aid.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant, in the U.S. Coast Artillery Officer’s Reserve Corps and was first assigned to the 7th Training Camp, at Fort Monroe, Va.

On Nov. 17, 1917, after the completion of the course at the Coast Artillery School, he was ordered to Fort Totten, Coast Defense of Eastern New York and was there assigned to the 32nd Company, Coast Artillery Corps, National Guard of New York–which was a 12 inch gun company. This was later made a part of the 58th regiment, C.A.C. where he was assigned to the 3rd Company, Eastern New York, which was also a 12 inch gun company.

About March 20, 1918, he was assigned to the 2nd Company, Eastern New York, a Mine Company, to which he remained attached until he was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army on January 31, 1919. For about two weeks of the latter period, however, he was in command of the 7th Anti-Aircraft Battery, Eastern New York.

In accordance with Executive Order 3029, dated Jan. 29, 1919, he should have returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on Dec. 28, 1918, but the records indicate that he returned on Feb. 1, 1919.


Payson A. Perrin, First Lieutenant, C.A.C., U.S. Army,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey with the rank of Aid.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Corps of the U.S. Army and on Oct. 16, 1917 he reported at the 2nd Training Camp, at Fort Monroe, Va.

He completed the course at the Training camp on November 27 and reported at Hoboken, N.J., on Dec. 10, under sailing orders. He arrived in France on Jan 10, 1918 and on Feb. 1 was assigned to the Heavy Artillery School at Mailly, for training. Having completed his course, on March 15, 1918, he was assigned to duty as Adjutant of the 4th Battalion, Provisional Howitzer Regiment, which later, at about the time of the formation of the first American Army, became known as the 1st Battalion, 44th Artillery Regiment.

On April 15, 1918, the regiment went to the front and into line at Recourt, a small village not far from Verdun.

About May 1, 1918, Lieut. Mudd (formerly of the U.S. Geological Survey) Orientuer of the 2nd Battalion of the regiment was wounded and put out of action, when Second Lieutenant Perrin was assigned as Orientuer of the battalion. He served in this capacity until Nov. 22, 1918, after the armistice. The regiment was then in position near Apremont, at the apex of the St. Mihiel Salient where there was considerable artillery action at all times.

During the latter part of May the regiment changed position to Foret du Puvenelle, near Pont a Mousson which was a more quiet locality.

About June 5, the regiment was hauled back and took position in the suburbs of Nancy for defense against a reported Austrian drive of considerable magnitude. The drive, however, did not develop and on June 25, the battalion returned to new positions in the Foret du Puvenelle. Soon thereafter the regiment was transferred from the 8th to the 4th French Army for use in blocking the expected German drive in the Champagne, and on July 3 took positions near St. Menehold. On the night of July 14 - 15 a German drive started and for several days action was very heavy. The result was that not much more than the front French lines were taken and this was the last large German offensive.

On July 16, the regiment took up positions near Suippes for aiding in a local attack for the retaking of the French line, and on July 24 took up positions in the Bois de Pyramides, near Rheims for assisting in the artillery preparation for retaking Mont San Nom. This action, however, was forestalled by the Germans and they drove another small salient into the French line, making further attempt to retake the Mont too costly an operation. While in this positions Lieutenant Perrin and about 100 men of his battalion were gassed and he was sent to the field hospital at Chalons. From there he was sent to the French hospital at Lyons and later to the American Hospital at Vichy. About the first of September he returned to his regiment, which was then on the move to join the American First Army, forming for the St. Mihiel drive.

During the month of September positions were occupied near Rambucourt and Thiacourt and the regiment participated in the Meuse-Argonne drive, with considerable heavy action in all localities.

On Sept. 21, 1918, Second Lieutenant Payson A. Perrin was promoted to First Lieutenant, Coast Artillery Corps, U.S. Army.

About the middle of October, 1918, the regiment to which he was attached was assigned to positions at the Bois de Beney, west of Thiacourt, preparations for the Metz drive being in progress. By November 11, preparations had been completed and positions within 500 meters of the German outposts were being occupied, but at 9 a.m. on that date, notification that there would be no advance was received. These positions were occupied until Nov. 22, when orders were received to proceed to the 18th Training Area for early return to the United States.

On Nov. 22, 1918, he was assigned as instructor at the Heavy Artillery School at Angers, France, where he remained until the course was completed on Dec. 15, 1918 after which he became casual officer awaiting his return to the United States. He sailed from Brest on Feb. 2, 1918; was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army at Fort Monroe, Va. on Feb. 18, 1918; and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.

During his service in France, Lieutenant Perrin was at the front with his regiment from the middle of April, 1918, until after the armistice, except for the time during the month of August, 1918, when he was at the hospitals at Lyons and Vichy for treatment for injury received from a gas attack. Besides service in the defense sections he participated in the Champagne, Marne and St. Mihiel operations.


John H. Peters, (Captain, E.O.R.C., U.S. Army, Lieutenant Commander, U.S.N.R.F.

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was assigned to active duty under the Chief of Engineers, U.S. Army, at Washington, D.C.

By Executive Order 2751, dated Nov. 7, 1917, his name was stricken from the list of Coast and Geodetic Survey Officers named to serve with the War Department in Executive Order 2707 and was added to the list of those named to serve with the Navy Department.

On Nov. 14, 1917, in accordance with Executive Order 2751, he was transferred from the U.S. Army to the U.S. Navy with the provisional rank of Lieutenant U.S.N.R.F. and was ordered to duty under the superior, Naval Auxiliary Reserves, at New York.

On Nov. 24, 1917, he was ordered by the Bureau of Navigation to duty as Navigation Officer on the U.S.S. George Washington.

On Feb. 14, 1918 he was given the provisional rank of Lieutenant Commander, Naval Auxiliary Reserve and was later regularly commissioned Lieutenant Commander U.S.N.R.F.

The active services of Lieutenant Commander John E. Peters while attached to the U.S. Navy was entirely on the U.S.S. George Washington, one of the largest steamships afloat, having a displacement of 37,000 tons, a length of 699 feet and draft of 33 feet. The vessel was engaged in transportation of troops between New York, Norfolk, and Brest, France. Lieutenant Commander Peters made twelve round trips with the vessel as Navigating Officer, while upon one of the trips the convoy of which the vessel was a part was attacked and resulted in the sinking of the U.S. S. Corrington one of the vessels of the convoy.

The Commanding Officers under whom Lieutenant Commander Peters served were Capt. E.T. Pollock, U.S.N., Capt. W.K. Wertman, U.S.N. and Capt. E. McCauley, U.S. N.

He was relieved from active duty in the U.S. Navy on March 3, 1919, and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.


Joan Petterson, Boatswain, U.S.N.R.F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707 he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer ISIS to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was Boatswain on the ISIS.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Boatswain in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and he served on the U.S.S. ISIS in that capacity until April 14, 1919, when he returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

C. G. Pierson, Seaman, U.S.N.R.F.,

On May 15, 1918, by Executive Order 2861, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Seamer Patterson to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a seaman on the Patterson.

There is no information available regarding whether on not he was enrolled in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force.


D. V. Pigford, U.S. Army (rank unknown),

Served as a hand in one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy, in the Coast and Geodetic Survey until March, 1918, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Army.


Robert Pigford, U.S. Army (rank unknown),

Served as a hand in one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy in the Coast and Geodetic Survey until Sept. 29, 1917, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Army.

Rufus E. Pinner, Quartermaster, Second Class, U.S.N.R.F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer ISIS to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a Quartermaster on the ISIS.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Quartermaster second Class in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, and served on the U.S.S. ISIS from that date until he was returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey, on April 23, 1919.


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