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world war 1 military records of caost and geodetic survey personnel


Louis Noblanc, U.S. Army (rating unknown)

Served as Master at Arms, on the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer [?] until June 6, 1917, when he was separated from the vessel and entered the U.S. Army.


Fritz C. Nyland, Ensign, U.S.N.R.F.

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the Service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey with the rank of Aid.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and was assigned to duty as Assistant Communication Officer on the U.S.S. ISIS, under Gilbert T. Rude, U.S.N.R.F. The vessel at that time was Flagship to Admiral F. Johnston, U.S.N., Commanding Escort Squadron of Naval Overseas Transportation Service.

He remained attached to the U.S.S. ISIS until January 13, 1918, when he resigned from the Coast and Geodetic Survey and accepted a temporary commission as Civil Engineer, U.S. Navy.


Thomas O'Conner, THOMAS, Seaman, U.S.N.R.F.

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer ISIS to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a seaman on the ISIS.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was enrolled as seaman in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and he served on the U.S.S. ISIS in that capacity from that date until April 25, 1919, when he was returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Floyd Oles, U.S. Army (rank unknown),

Served as fireman on the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer Yukon until October 16, 1917, when he separated from this vessel and entered the Coast Artillery of the U.S. Army.


P.K. Oscarson, Coxswain, U.S.N.R.F.

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer ISIS to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was Coxswain, Power Launch, on the ISIS.

Effective September 24, 1917 he was enrolled as coxswain in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and served on the U.S.S. ISIS, but the length of his service is not known at this office, as he did not return to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Robert C. Overton, Ensign, U.S.N.R.F.

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer Bache to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a Mate on the Bache.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, at Norfolk, Va., on November 26, 1917.

From the date of his transfer until September 13, 1918, he served as Watch Officer on board of the U.S.S. Bache, the vessel being engaged in guard and patrol duty in the vicinity of Cape Henry, Va. He was then transferred to the Department of Tugs and in October, 1918 he was assigned as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Advance, engaged in harbor towing, docking and undocking vessels, and in Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Coast towing. He remained in Command of the U.S.S. Advance until relieved from active duty in the U.S. Navy on March 26, 1919, and he returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on April 1, 1919.


Osborne H. Paddison, Lieutenant (j.g.) (E), U.S.N.R.F.

On May 15, 1918, by Executive Order 2861, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer Patterson to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was Chief Engineer of the Patterson.

On June 1, 1918, he was enrolled in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and was given the provisional rank and grade of Lieutenant (j.g.) (Engineer Duties Only). On June 8, 1918 he accepted his appointment and took the oath of office.

On July 1, 1918 in accordance with orders, he reported to the Office-in-Charge, Navy Recruiting Station, Seattle, Washington, who directed him to proceed to San Francisco, California and report to Supervisor, Naval Auxiliary Reserve at that place for assignment to active duty.

From July 10 to August 25, 1918, he served in the office of the Supervisor, Naval Auxiliary Reserve at San Francisco, when he was detached and assigned to the Navy Yard, Mare Island, California for duty in connection with fitting out of the U.S.S. Violet and on board that vessel as Senior Engineer Officer when commissioned.

On January 11, 1919, he was detached from the U.S.S. Violet and in accordance with orders reported on January 14, to the Supervisor, Naval Auxiliary Reserve at San Francisco for assignment to duty. On February 5, 1919, he was detached from duty at that office and was ordered to report to the Supervisor, Naval Auxiliary Reserve at New York for duty, where he reported on February 13, 1919, and soon thereafter was assigned for temporary duty under the Director of the U.S. Navy School of Turbine Engineering, Carnegie Institute of Technology, Pittsburgh, Pa., where he remained until the temporary duty was completed on March 15, 1919 and on the following day in accordance with orders reported to Lieutenant J. J. Henry, U.S.N.R.F., at Schenectady, N.Y. for temporary duty.

He was relieved from active duty in the U.S. Navy on April 2, 1919, returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day, and was assigned to duty as Chief Engineer of the Steamer ISIS.


Edwin H. Pagenhart, Captain, E.O.R.C., U.S. Army,

On May 20, 1918, by Executive Order 2863, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department and was commissioned Captain in the Engineer Officer’s Reserve Corps of the U.S. Army. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned hydrographic and Geodetic in the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

From June 15, to August 15, 1918, he was at the Engineer Officer’s Training Camp at Camp Lee and Camp Humphrey, Va.

On August 15, 1918, he was assigned to the 472nd Engineers and was placed in command of the Ft. Sill, Oklahoma Detachment of the same regiment. He was ordered to make a battle map for the use of the Field Artillery in the training of officers, but while this work was still in progress he was detached and ordered to Pensacola, Florida.

On November 29, 1918, he was ordered to take charge of the control work of the topographic map of the area within a radius of twenty miles of the entrance to Pensacola Bay. The work involved levels, traverse and triangulation and at the time of his discharge had been extended over about one third of the area.

Captain Pagenhart was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army, at Washington, D.C., on March 6, 1919 and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.

A copy of a letter from Major General W. M. Black, Chief of Engineers, U.S. Army, dated April 15, 1919, conveying appreciation of the services of Captain Pagenhart appears in Appendix I of this report.


Ernest Parker, U.S. Army (rank unknown),

Served as a hand in one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, until May 13, 1918, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Army.


H. F. Parker, Seaman, U.S.N.R.F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer Bache to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a seaman on the Bache.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was enrolled as seaman, in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and he served in that capacity on the U.S.S. Bache, but the length of his service is not known at this office, as he did not return to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


William E. Parker, Lieutenant Commander, U.S.N.R.F.,,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer.

On October 8, 1917, he was enrolled as Lieutenant Commander in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, Class 4 for duty in Class 5, and was placed on waiting orders until October 19, on which date he was ordered to report to the Superintendent of the Naval Observatory.

His first duty at the Naval Observatory as that of Assistant in the Division of Time Service and National Instruments and in the Division of Compasses. After serving a while in both divisions he was permanently assigned to the Compass Office and made Assistant to the Superintendent of Compasses, who was also Assistant Superintendent of the Observatory. During the absence of the Superintendent of Compasses he performed his duties including those of Executive officer at the Naval Observatory.

On March 1, 1918, he was placed in charge of the Compass Office and continued in this position until relieved from active duty in the Navy, March 20, 1919.

While in charge of the Compass Division, his duties consisted of preparing allowance lists of compass material for Navy vessels of all kinds, the preparation of specifications for the manufacture of this material, the determination of quantities required and the recommendation of awards, and also the inspection of this material.

The compass office at the Naval Observatory had Supervision over all kinds of compasses in the Navy, including the magnetic compass on all classes of surface vessels, submarines, aircraft, and gyroscope compasses.

While he was in charge of the Compass Office, the Navy adopted on the recommendation of the Naval Observatory a new type of ship standard magnetic compass, a new type of submarine magnetic compass binnacle, two types of aircraft compasses, and a new type of gyroscope compass.

Lieutenant Commander Parker on February 25, 1919 was recommended for promotion to Commander by Rear Admiral T.B. Howard, U.S.N. Retired, who at that time was Superintendent of the Naval Observatory, but was relieved from active duty by Executive Order before any action could be taken.

Further information relating to his services at the Naval Observatory appears in a copy of a letter from Rear Admiral Howard in part II of this report, which refers to his valuable services and eight other officers of the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

On March 20, 1917, he was relieved from active duty with the Navy and on the following day returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Doreteo Pascoal, U.S.N. (rank unknown),

Served as Quartermaster on the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer Pathfinder until November 2, 1917, when he separated from the vessel, at Manila, P.I., and enlisted in the U.S. Navy.


Raymond S. Patton, Lieutenant Commander, U.S.N.R.F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a Commissioned Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer.

He was enrolled as Lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, Class 4 for 3 and on Nov. 19, 1917, was assigned to the Bureau of Navigation, U.S. Naval Observatory as Assistant in the Time Service and Nautical Instrument Division, under Rear Admiral J.B. Howard, U.S.N. Retired. He served as Assistant in this division until March 1, 1918, when he was placed in charge, relieving Commander C.T. Jewell, U.S.N. Retired.

This division was charged with the purchase and distribution to naval vessels of all navigational instruments except compasses and compass fixtures: with the cleaning, compensation rating and issue of chronometers to the naval service; and with sending out the daily time signal by telegraph and radio.

Prior to the war, these instruments had been obtained largely from various foreign sources of supply, and upon the elimination of these sources it became necessary to develop the production of such instruments in this country. This fact, combined with the urgency and amount of the demand rendered the task of their procurement decidedly difficult at times, and in some cases it was only by purchasing, borrowing or commandeering every existing instrument which could be located, that the demand was successfully met.

He was promoted to Lieutenant Commander, U.S.N.R.F. on Oct. 1, 1918, was honorably discharged on March 31, 1919 and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on April 1, 1919.

For further information, see letter of March 4, 1919, from Read Admiral T. B. Howard, U.S.N. Retired, which refers to the valuable services of Lieut. Commander Raymond S. Patton and eight other officers of the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


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