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world war 1 military records of caost and geodetic survey personnel


James F. Knight, Engineman, first class, U.S.N.R.F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer SURVEYOR to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a fireman on the SURVEYOR

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Engineman first class in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, and he served on the U.S.S. SURVEYOR, but the length of his service is not known at this office, as he did not return to the Coast and Geodetic survey.


Addison Kilgore, U.S.N.R.F. (rank unknown),

On May 16, by Executive Order 2861, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer PATTERSON to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was Assistant to Engineer on the PATTERSON.
There is no information available regarding whether or not he enrolled in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force.


J. L.
Kerig, Quartermaster, third class, U.S.N.R.F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer SURVEYOR to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a seaman on the SURVEYOR.


Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Quartermaster, Second Class, in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, and he served on the U.S.S. SURVEYOR, but the length of his service is unknown at this office, as he did not return to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Harold L. Kirby, U.S. Navy, (rank unknown),

Served as Computer in the office of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until April 25, 1918, when he resigned on account of his having been assigned for active duty under the Commanding Officer, Naval Aviation Detachment, 2-390 Massachusetts Institute of Technology for instruction as Student Flight Officer.


Omer G. Kremkau, U.S. Army (rank unknown),

Served as hand in one of the field parties operated by the Division of Geodesy of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until May 15, 1918, when he separated and entered the U.S. Army.


Frank Lambert, U. S. Army (rank unknown),

Served as a hand in one of the field parties operated by the Division of Geodesy of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until May, 1918, when he separated and entered the U.S. Army.


Walter D. Lambert, First Lieutenant, Engineer Corps, U.S. Army,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a geodetic computer with the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was ordered to active duty as First Lieutenant, Engineer Reserve Corps, U.S. Army. He was first assigned to the American University Training Camp and at the close of his course was ordered to Camp Dix, N.J., and attached to Company D, 303rd Engineers.
On Jan. 26, 1918, he sailed for France under orders as casual officer and upon arrival he was ordered to the First Corps School at Condrecourt where he completed the engineer and infantry courses.

April 26, 1918, he was attached to Company B, 101st Engineers in the Toul Sector and on July 2, he was assigned to duty with the Engineer Purchasing Office, involving the command of a detachment station at a cement mill, near Mantes-sur-Seine, and later of Cement Mills No. 6 at that place.

With the 303rd Engineers he served under Capt. Gausman, while with the 101st Engineers he served under Capt. Hadley, and with the Engineer Purchasing Office, under Lieut. Col. H.S. Spackman and Capt. W.E. McHenry.

He was engaged in the ususal company duties with the 303rd and 101st Engineers, and with the latter regiment also in the construction of wire entanglement and shelters. The work at Mantes-sur-Seine involved the usual duties connected with the command of the detachment there and later of Cement Mills Company No. 6. The detachment and the company were operating the cement making plant and also making cement pipe. For a part of the time a portion of the Company was in the neighboring town of Beaumont-sur-Oise and visits of inspection were made there. The work also involved trips in the vicinity to make purchases and in connection with other matters. Mantes-sur-Seine was on the main line of travel from Le Havre to Paris and the responsibility for keeping order there, as far as members of the A.E.F. were concerned, devolved on the forces under his command.

He was honorably discharged at the office of the Chief of Engineers at Washington, D.C., on May 15, 1919, and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.


T. R. Landing, Machinist, U.S.N.R.F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707 he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer ISIS to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer, he was Assistant to Engineer, first class on the ISIS.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Machinist in the U.S. Naval Reserve Corps, and he served on the U.S.S. ISIS, but the length of his service is not known at this office, as he did not return to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Paul V. Lane, Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey with the rank of Aid.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was enrolled as provisional Ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and on February 20, 1918, he was assigned to duty on the U.S.S. NORTHERN PACIFIC at Bremerton Navy Yard, Washington and for transportation to New York. On the voyage he served as Junior Watch Officer and assisted in navigation.

The vessel arrived at Hoboken, New Jersey on March 17, 1918 and on the following day he reported in accordance with orders to the Supervisor, Naval Auxiliary Reserve at New York.

He was first placed in charge of Holland American freighter SASSENHEIM, 2152 gross tons, where he remained until March 29, 1918, when the vessel was turned over to the U.S. Shipping Board. On April 30, 1918, he was promoted to Lieutenant (j.g.) U. S. N. R. F.

On April 2, 1918, he was assigned to duty as Senior Watch and Division Officer on the U. S. S. RIJNDAM, a former Holland American Line passenger steamer, which was being fitted for troop transport service. The vessel was of 12527 gross tons with troop capacity of 3100 and was commanded by Commander W. L. Pryor, U. S. N.

On May 10, the vessel put to sea with troops and thereafter averaged about one trip a month to France.

On December 4, 1918, he was assigned to duty as Assistant Navigator of the vessel and he served in that capacity until detached on March 21, 1919. A copy of a letter from his commanding officer, highly commending him for his intelligent and efficient services appears in Appendix I of this report.

On January 5, 1919, he was promoted to Lieutenant, U. S. N. R. F.

He was relieved from active duty in the U.S. Navy on March 21, 1919, and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on April 1, 1919.


Wilbur R. Lea, Private, U S. Army,

Served as a messenger and laborer in the office of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until July 22, 1918, when he resigned on account of his having entered the U.S. Army.

On July 18, 1918, at Yanceville, N.C., he enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army, and he was assigned to Company “M”, Pioneer Infantry. He served with the American Expeditionary Forces from August 31, 1918, until June 22, 1919 and received the Victory Badge.

He was honorably discharged at Camp Lee, Virginia, on July 3, 1918, and was reinstated at Laborer, Classified, in the Coast and Geodetic Survey on September 2, 1919.


Alfred N. Lee, U.S.N.R.F. (rank unknown),
On May 16, 1918, by Executive Order 2861, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer EXPLORER to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was Quartermaster, Second Class on the EXPLORER. There is no information available at this office regarding whether or not he enrolled in the U.S. Naval Reserve Corps.


Harvey Lee, U.S. Army (rank unknown),

Served as a hand in one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, until May 13, 1918, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Army.


Maurcie E. Levey, Lieutenant (j.g.) U.S.N.R.F.

On April 12, 1918, by Executive Order 2839, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned Junior Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

Effective April 12, 1918, he was enrolled as Lieutenant (j.g.) in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force on April 20, 1918, and on the same date proceeded to New York under orders from the Navy Department, when he reported to the Supervisor, Naval Auxiliary Reserve.

No report relating to his various assignments has been placed on file in this office, but in accordance with information received on July 15, 1918, he was then attached to the U.S.S. PASTORES, and in accordance with information received on January 30, 1918, he was then attached to the U.S.S. LANCASTER as Navigating Officer.

The following information relating to the experience of Lieutenant (J.G.) Levy during the war is extracted from a letter received from him on April 1, 1919.

In May, 1918, while the U.S.S. PASTORES, the vessel to which he was attached, was eastbound in convoy a submarine alarm was given, two ships having fired at suspicious objects on the right flank and on the left. The vessels to the immediate right and left of the PASTORES changed courses in such a manner as to cause collision unless the PASTORES was stopped, which action might prove fatal if a submarine were in the vicinity. The vessel was maneuvered so that each of the others in turn were forced to change course. This action was complimented by the Commanding Officer.

In July, 1918, the convey was three times attacked by submarines, but in each case they had to submerge before they could fire. In one of these cases a periscope came up about two hundred yards directly in front of the convoy. Several depth charges were dropped and it is believed that the U-boat was destroyed.

In August, 1918, while steaming independently westward about 250 miles off the Virginia Capes, the vessel was attacked by a submarine, which opened gun fire, which was returned, and the submarine was forced to submerge after the vessel had fired nine shots. Again in August, 1918, while in convoy, eastward bound, about 200 miles off the north coast of France, the vessel was attacked by a submarine during the night. A torpedo passed under the stern of the vessel, missing the rudder by a few yards.

In addition, several other minor incidents are referred to in the same letter, all of which indicate that the vessel to which he was attached had considerable war experience.

On March 8, 1919, Lieutenant (J.G.) Levy was relieved from active duty in the U.S. Navy and on the following day returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


W.P.
Lewis, U.S. Navy (rank unknown),

Served as a hand in one of the field parties operated under the Division of Hydrography and Topography of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until May 25, 1918, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Navy.


P.C.
Littlefield, U.S. Army, (rank unknown),

Served as a rodman in one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until December 4, 1917, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Army.


Adolph Loken, U.S.N.R.F. (rank unknown),

On May 16, 1918, by Executive Order 2861, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer EXPLORER to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was Assistant to Engineer on the EXPLORER.

There is no information available regarding whether or not he enrolled in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force.


Frank J. C. Loubat, U.S. Army (rank unknown),

Served as Chief Writer on the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer HYDROGRAPHER until September 17, 1917, when he resigned and entered the U.S. Army.


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