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world war 1 military records of caost and geodetic survey personnel


Carey V. Hodgson, Major, Engineer Corps, U. S. Army,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer, he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey, as a commissioned Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was enrolled as captain, Engineers Reserve Corps, U.S. Army. He was first assigned to the Engineer Officers Training Camps at Belvoir, Va., and at American University.

On Dec. 8, 1917, after completing his preliminary training, he was ordered to the 104th Engineers at Camp McClellan, Anniston, Ala., and he remained with that organization during the entire period of the war.

The 104th Engineers was organized as a pioneer (sapper) regiment for duty with the 29th Division, which was a National Guard Division from New Jersey, Maryland, District of Columbia and Virginia. Such regiments are given the same infantry and combat drills as the regular infantry and are supposed to function as support troops in an emergency, but their primary duties are to perform such emergency engineering work as may be necessary in the division area.

The regiment remained in training at Camp McClellan until June 14, 1918, when it entrained for Hoboken and went directly aboard the NORTHERN PACIFIC, arriving at Brest, France, on June 24. After a week there at Pontanesen Barracks the division went to its training area near Chalindre, where it remained only ten days, until it was sent to the vicinity of Belfort. About July 28, it was assigned to a part of the Center Sector, Alsace, where his company was engaged in dugout work adjacent to the Swiss border. Soon thereafter, however, he was sent to Division Headquarters, where he remained until the division went into action north of Verdun. His duties were partially those of Topographical Officer and partially Assistant to the Division Engineer, who was also the commanding officer of the104th Engineers.
About the middle of Sept., 1918, the division was sent north for the Argonne offensive, but was in Army reserve until Oct. 5, when it went into action north of Verdun, on the east bank of the Meuse. He was kept at division headquarters in the citadel of Verdun until Oct. 12, when he rejoined the regiment at the front, first as battalion adjutant and on Oct. 23 was put in command of the 2nd battalion although information of his majority did not come through until Nov. 5.

He was promoted from Captain to Major in the Engineer Corps of the U.S. Army on Oct. 29, 1918, and was unusually fortunate in securing this promotion, as it was the first majority made in the regiment while stationed in France.

The work of the regiment in the operations north of Verdun was largely on roads, though there was some work in the organization of the front line positions. It was never used as infantry at the front, but it worked for three weeks under constant heavy shell fire, with frequent gas attacks.

After the armistice, the division was sent to the rear near Bourboune - les - Bains, where it was engaged in drilling and working the roads.

On Jan. 19, 1919, Major Hodgson was detached from his regiment in France and was ordered to the United States. On Feb. 19, 1919, he reported to the office of the Chief of Engineers at Washington, D.C., where he was honorably discharged on March 8, 1919, returning to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.


Robert J. Hole, First Lieutenant C.A.R.C., U.S. Army,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey, with the rank of Aid.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Corps of the U.S. Army.

From Oct. 5 to Nov. 27, 1917, he was at the Coast Artillery School at Fortress Monroe, Va., and on Dec. 27 he embarked at New York for service in France.

From Feb. 12 to April 10, 1918, he was with Battery “I”, 51st Artillery, C.A.C., located at Mailly - le -camp and Haussimont, France, where he served in regular battery duty and instructed in Fire control and Drill on 8 inch howitzers.

From April 11 to August, 1918, he was with Provisional Howitzer Regiment, 4th Battalion, where he was assigned as Orientation Officer. This organization went into the front lines near Ft. Troyon on the first of May, 1918. Various positions along the River Meuse were occupied. The name of the organization was changed in August to the 3rd Battalion of the 51st Artillery, C.A.C.
The Battalion to which he was attached was actively engaged from April to October, 1918, with the French Artillery, aiding in general “fixed front” bombardments until the St. Mihiel attack but afterwards participated in the advance in the Argonne region under American command.

He was promoted to First Lieutenant, C.A.R.C. on Sept 21, 1918.

On Feb. 6, 1919, he was honorably discharged from the U. S. Army at Camp Dix, N.J., and on the following day he returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

F. Hollander, U. S. Navy, (rank unknown),

Served as a hand with one of the field parties operated by the Division of Hydrography and Topography of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until July 23, 1917, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Navy.

L. Holst, Boatswain, U. S. N. R. F.,

Transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department, with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer EXPLORER, by Executive Order 2861, dated May 15, 1918. Previous to his transfer, he was Boatswain on the EXPLORER.

There is no information on file regarding his enrollment in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force.


Roland D. Horne, First Lieutenant, C.A.C., U. S. Army,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey with the rank of Aid.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Corps of the U.S. Army. On Oct. 6, 1917, he arrived at Fortress Monroe, Va., under orders, and was assigned to the 3rd Company of the 2nd Artillery Officers’ Training Camp for instruction in gunnery, topography, artillery defense, company administration, and drill on the guns.

From Dec. 15, 1917, to July 12, 1918, he was stationed at Fort Standish, Boston, Mass., where he served in various capacities in accordance with his rank and at times served as company commander, in charge of batteries and as instructor in mathematics.

On July 12, 1918, he was assigned to the office of Coast Defense Headquarters and ordered to duty at Fort Warren, Coast Defense Headquarters, where his duties consisted in part in a general oversight of all ordnance equipment in the Coast Defense from the 12" batteries to the personal equipment of the men and also in the obtaining of the equipment for overseas outfits. He served in this capacity until Nov. 25, 1918, after which he acted as Field Adjutant for the commanding officer.
On August 31, 1918, he was promoted to First Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Corps. He was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army on Jan. 4, 1919, and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.


Leonard G. Homes, Lieutenant Commander, U.S.N.R.F.,

Was a mate on the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer SURVEYOR when that vessel was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department by Executive Order 2707, on Sept. 24, 1917. He declined to enroll in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force at that time on account of prospects for securing a higher rating than he might obtain through direct transfer. His resignation from the Coast and Geodetic Survey, effective Sept. 23, 1917, was therefore accepted. Later information was received that he enrolled as Lieutenant (j.g.) in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and sometime during the period of the war was promoted to Lieutenant Commander.


James Hughes, Captain’s Steward, U.S.N.R.F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer BACHE to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was steward on the BACHE.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Captain’s Steward in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and he served on the U.S.S. BACHE from that date until June 21, 1919, when he was returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Charles M. Hunter, U. S. Army (rank unknown),

Served as a clerk in the office of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey until Oct. 20, 1917, when he resigned and enlisted in the U.S. Army.


Emery Huse, Aviation Service, U.S. Army (rank unknown)

Served as a computer in the office of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until May 13, 1918, when he resigned and entered the Aviation Service of the U.S. Army.


Robert F. Hutchinson, Field Clerk, U.S. Army,

He resigned as clerk, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey on Dec. 31, 1917, when he was appointed as Army Field Clerk under the adjutant General’s Department of the U.S. Army.

There is no detailed information relating to his activities available, but a letter from him dated April 4, 1918, indicates that he at that time was connected with the Statistical Division and was located in France.

William F. Jacobsen, U. S. Army (rank unknown),

Served as Foreman with one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until Sept. 24, 1917, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Army.


Arthur Joachims, Lieutenant Commander, U.S. N. R. F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned Junior Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was commissioned Lieutenant (j.g.) in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and on Feb. 23, 1918, he was assigned as Watch Officer to the U.S.S. NORTHERN PACIFIC for the trip from Bremerton Navy Yard, Wash., to New York. The vessel was loaded with troops for Norfolk, Va.

On March 20, 1918, he was promoted to Lieutenant and was ordered to the U.S.S. ANTIGONE as Assistant Navigator for the purpose of qualifying for Navigator. This vessel was a former German ship named the MECKAR. She was of 9800 gross tons, carried a crew of 635 men and was equipped to carry 2400 troops. On March 30, 1918, he sailed on his first voyage, in convoy, to France, the vessel having troops aboard. From that date the ANTIGONE was kept busy on the trans-Atlantic run between the United States and France carrying troops.

On July 15, 1918, he was assigned to the duty of Navigator to the ANTIGONE and on
August 20, 1918, he was promoted from Lieutenant to Lieutenant Commander U.S.N.R.F.

He made eight round trips between the United States and Frances upon six of which he was Navigating Officer. During these voyages the vessel met with several submarine attacks, the most serious was while accompanying the U.S.S. PRESIDENT LINCOLN when she was torpedoed and sunk.

While serving as navigator on the ANTIGONE, he made investigations relating to the accuracy of wireless direction stations and made a report of his results to the Navy Department.

His services with the Navy were under Captain C. F. Preston, U.S.N., Commanding the U.S.S. NORTHERN PACIFIC, Captain J.R. Defrees, U.S.N., Captain E.N. Dodd, U.S.N., and Captain H.W. Osterhous, Commanding officers of the U.S.S. ANTIGONE.
On Feb. 29, 1919, he was relieved from active duty in the U.S. Navy and on the following day returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


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