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world war 1 military records of caost and geodetic survey personnel


J. J. Harris, Seaman, U. S. N. R. F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707 he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer ISIS, to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was Writer on the ISIS. Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Seaman in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, and he served on the U. S. S. ISIS from that date until April 25, 1919, when he was returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Henry Harrison, U. S. Navy (rank unknown),

Transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department, with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer PATTERSON, by Executive Order 2861, May 16, 1918. No information is available regarding his enrollment under the U.S. Naval Reserve Force. His previous service upon the Steamer PATTERSON was that of Quartermaster Second Class.

E.B. Harsh, U.S. Army (rank unknown),

He was a Writer on the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer EXPLORER, until June 3, 1917, when he separated from the vessel and entered the U.S. Army.


Oscar Hart, Warrant Machinist, U.S.N.R.F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer BACHE, to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous on his transfer he was serving as Assistant to Engineer on the BACHE.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Warrant Machinist in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and served on the U. S. S. BACHE, but the length of his service is unknown at this office as he did not return to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


George R. Hartley, First Lieutenant, C.A.R.C., U.S. Army,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707 he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey with the rank of Aid.
Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Officers Reserve Corps and on October 4, 1917, he was ordered to the Second Officers Training Camp at Fortress Monroe, Va., where he remained until Dec. 17, when he reported at Fort Totten, N.Y., in accordance with orders.

On December 26, 1917, he was assigned to duty with the 31st N.G.U.S. in C.D. of E.N.Y.

On Feb. 1, 1918, he was assigned to Headquarters Company at the formation of that regiment, at Fort Totten, with duties as Instructor in surveying and orientation.

May 10, 1918, he sailed for France on the U.S.S. COVINGTON with the 58th Artillery
C. A. C.

During the months of June and July, 1918, he attended the Orienteur School at Limoges, France, and on July 25, he was assigned to Battery “E” 50th Artillery C. A. C. The regiment was held in reserve until October 25 when Battery “E” took position in the Boise le Pretre in the Toul-Mets Sector, at which time he was in charge of the battery. He was promoted to First Lieutenant, C.A.C.

Nov. 11, 1918, Brigadier General Howley cited the Battery for effective counter battery firing.

On Jan. 10, 1919, Lieutenant Hartley received orders relieving him from duty with the 58th Artillery C. A. C., in the American Expeditionary Forces and directing him to return to the United States.

On March 3, 1919, he was honorably discharged from the U. S. Army at Camp Dix, New Jersey, and on the following day he returned to duty with the Coast and Geodetic Survey. His military record credits him as having been a Battery Commander and states that he was in battle at Bois le Pretre, Toul Section in Nov. 1918, and that he was authorized one gold war service chevron.


C. J. Hausman, U.S.N.R.F. (rank unknown),

On May 16, 1918, by Executive Order 2861, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer EXPLORER to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was Chief Carpenter’s Mate on the EXPLORER. There is no information available at this office regarding whether or not he was enrolled in the U. S. Naval Reserve Force.


Rufus Haydon, U.S. Army (rank unknown),

Served as a hand with one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodetic of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until April 1, 1918, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Army.

Chester Hayes, U.S. Army (rank unknown),

Served as a hand with one of the field parties operated under the Division of Geodesy of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, until April 6, 1918, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Army.


Nicholas H. Heck, Lieutenant Commander, U. S. N. R. F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer, he was a commissioned Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was commissioned Lieutenant in the U. S. Naval Reserve Force, and on Oct. 9, he was detailed to the Naval Experimental Station at New London Connecticut. While upon this duty he served at new London under Captain S.S. Robinson, Senior Member Special Board of Anti-Submarine devices and later under Captain J.R. De Frus. At the Naval Experimental Station he served under Commander S.S. McDowell and at the Naval base, under Captain W. F. Tarrant and Admiral B.C. Decker. The duties were complicated, but related chiefly to the development of trailing wire device for locating submarines at rest on the bottom. For detailed information relating to these duties, see the Special report by Lieutenant Commander Heck on page 396 of this report.

He continued on duty in connection with the Naval Experimental Station until Sept. 18, 1918, when he was assigned to duty at the U.S. Naval Headquarters, London, England, under Commander of the U.S. Forces operating in European waters, for putting into operation the results of previous experimental work. On Nov. 5 everything was in readiness, but on Nov. 7 orders were received to suspend operations which ceased entirely after the signing of the Armistice.

On Dec. 15, 1918, he returned to New London, Conn., and resumed his duties at the Naval Experimental Station.

On Feb. 25, 1919, he was promoted to Lieutenant Commander U. S. N. R. F.

He was relieved from active duty in the U.S. Navy on March 19, 1919, and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.


Wilmer C. Hinkley, Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F.,

On Sept. 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707 he was transferred to the Service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey , with the rank of Aid.
Effective Sept. 24, 1917, he was commissioned Ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force. In accordance with orders from the Navy Department he remained attached to the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer PATTERSON until Feb. 21, 1918, when he was assigned to the U.S.S. NORTHERN PACIFIC for instruction and for passage to New York City, where upon arrival he was assigned to the office of the Supervisor, Naval Auxiliary Reserve. Between March 15 and March 27 he was assisting in taking over some of the Dutch vessels at New York, and was then ordered to Porto Rico for duty in a similar capacity.

On April 10, 1918, he was appointed Executive Officer of the U.S.S. ZUIDERDIJK which sailed from Porto Rico to Colon, Panama, thence to New York and France, and on Sept. 1, 1918, he was made Navigating Officer upon his own request.

He was relieved from active duty with the U.S. Navy on Jan. 7, 1919, and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on Feb. 25, 1919.


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