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world war 1 military records of caost and geodetic survey personnel


Herbert R. Grumann, First Lieutenant, C.A.R.C., U. S. Army,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey with the rank of Aid.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Reserve Corp of the U.S. Army. In accordance with orders, on October 9, 1917, he reported at the Second Officers Training School at Fort Monroe, Va., where he remained in training until about December 15 when he was assigned to duty with the recruit companies at Fort Barrages, Florida, where he was later attached to the 64th Artillery, C.A.C., which was organized at that post. While at Fort Barrancas, Florida, where he was later attached to the 64th Artillery, C.A.C., which was organized at that post. While at Fort Barrancas he took supervision of a school of radio operators and he was also a member of a special court.

On May 23, 1918, he was appointed Assistant Signal Officer under the Artillery Engineer and on June 28, 1918, Coast Defense Ordnance Officer.

On October 9, 1918, he was assigned to duty on the U.S. Army Mine Planter SCHOFIELD stationed at Fort Moultrie, S.C., where he served as Summary Court and Executive Officer.

He was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army on January 24, 1919, and resigned from the Coast and Geodetic Survey, effective upon the same date.


William V. Hagar, Lieutenant (j.g.) U.S.N.R.F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer, he was a commissioned Junior Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer.

On October 9, 1917, he was directed by the Bureau of Navigation of the Navy Department to report at the nearest Recruiting Office or the Navy Yard at Washington, D.C., for physical examination as a provisional Lieutenant (j.g.) U.S.N.R.F.

After examination on October 10, 1917, he was rejected on account of physical disqualification and he was returned to the service and jurisdiction of the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the same date. See, Executive Order 2760, dated November 23, 1917.
Soon thereafter he was placed upon furlough without pay on account of physical disability and he died on March 21, 1921.

He was an officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey from December 6, 1912, until his death. Mr. Hagar was born March 25, 1888, at Waybridge, Vermont. He was educated at Middleburg College, Vermont, 1905-1909. George Washington University, Washington, D.C., October, 1910 - May, 1911, taking a course in mathematics, science and civil engineering.

On February 16, 1912, he was appointed as assistant engineer in the United States and Canadian Boundary Service, having previously been employed in the Bureau of Census from January 3, 1910, to January 10, 1912, and in the office of the Civil Service Commission from January 16, 1912, to February 15, 1912.

On December 6, 1912, he entered the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a Deck Officer. On January 22, 1913, he was appointed an Aid in the Coast Survey and was afterwards promoted to the position of Junior Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer, which he held at the time of his death. Mr. Hagar, during his term of service was employed in triangulation, hydrography and topography on both the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts of the United States, and in the Philippine Islands. He was an active and efficient officer and performed valuable work in the service.


Frank Hall, Seaman, U.S.N.R.F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer ISIS to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a seaman on the ISIS.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Seaman in the U. S. S. Naval Reserve Force and he served on the U.S.S. ISIS, but there is no record in this office relating to his length of service.


Gordon A. Hamilton, Ship’s Cook, Second Class, U.S.N.R.F.,

Transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department, with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer PATTERSON by Executive Order 2861, May 16, 1918. Previous to his transfer he was Ship’s Cook, Second Class on the PATTERSON.

Although transferred, there is evidence on file that he was not regularly enrolled in the U.S. Naval Reserve, but left the U.S.S. PATTERSON soon after that vessel was transferred. According to information on file he afterwards served with the U.S. Shipping Board and graduated as Mariner at the West Seattle Sea Training Station on Oct. 24, 1918.

He lost his life by drowning, when the British Schooner JANET GARRUTHERS was wrecked in Gray’s Harbor, Wash., on Jan. 21, 1919.

Arthur S. Hallburg, First Lieutenant C.A.R.C., U. S. Army, Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned Junior Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was commissioned First Lieutenant in the U.S. Coast Artillery Reserve Corps, U.S. Army, but on December 11, 1917, his resignation of this commission was accepted and on December 14, 1917, he was appointed Lieutenant (j.g.) in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, in accordance with the provisions of the Act of Congress approved August 29, 1916, and the regulations of the government of the Naval Reserve.

He was later promoted to Lieutenant U.S.N.R.F., but there is no information on file relating to his activities in the war further than that he served on the U.S.S. QUINNEBAUG.

On March 18, 1919, he was relieved from active duty in the U.S. Navy and on March 21, 1919, he returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey, where he served until July 7, 1919, when he resigned from the Service.


Francis H. Hardy, Lieutenant Commander, U.S.N.R.F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer, he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey, as a commissioned Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer, and was in command of the Steamer SURVEYOR, which was also transferred by the same Executive Order.

His original assignment was that of Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. SURVEYOR, at Norfolk, Va.., with the rank of Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F., effective September 24, 1917. On October 6, 1917, he was enrolled as Lieutenant Commander, U.S.N.R.F., which rank he held at the completion of his service with the Navy.

He was detached from the U.S.S. SURVEYOR by orders of November 6, 1917, and reported to the Supervisor of the Naval Auxiliary Reserve, New York. On Nov. 16, he was ordered and reported for duty on the U.S.S. MARTHA WASHINGTON in connection with fitting her out for duty as a transport, and as Navigating Officer when commissioned.

While attached to the U.S.S. Troopship MARTHA WASHINGTON, he made eight round trips before the armistice was signed, between ports in the United States and France. He served as First Lieutenant for two round trips and as Executive Officer for six round trips.

On Dec. 20, 1918, he was detached from the U.S.S. MARTHA WASHINGTON, and in accordance with orders proceeded to Seattle, Wash., and reported for duty in charge of the Branch Hydrographic Office at Seattle, proceeded to Washington, D.C., under orders and was relieved from active duty in the Navy on March 17, 1919. On the following day he returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


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