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world war 1 military records of caost and geodetic survey personnel


Arthur Ela, Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned Junior Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was enrolled in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force as Lieutenant (j.g.) and later was promoted to Lieutenant.

Under orders from the Navy Department, he remained in command of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer YUKON until February 15, 1918, when he was detached and ordered to the Navy Department at Washington, D.C. On February 27, 1918, he was assigned to duty under Rear Admiral T. B. Howard, U.S. N. (Retired), Superintendent of the Naval Observatory, as Inspector of Material at the Works of E.S. Ritehis & Sons, Star Compass Co., Chelsea Clock Co., W. O. White and Buff and Buff Manufacturing Co., all of Boston, Mass. He served in that capacity until December 9, when he was detached and ordered to Duty under the Supervisor, Naval Auxiliary Reserve, New York, N.Y.
On December 20, 1918, he was ordered to duty in connection with the U.S.S. NORTH POLE, and for duty as Executive Officer, when commissioned, under Lieutenant Commander Thos. H. McKellum, U.S.N.R.F. On January 9, 1919, he was ordered for duty aboard the U. S. S. ZEELANDIA as Navigator, under Commander D. Lyons, U.S.N.

He was retired from active duty in the U.S. Navy on March 20, 1919, and returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey on the following day.


Lewis K. Ellenbogen, Private, U. S. Army,

He was a clerk at the Coast and Geodetic Survey Field Station. New York City until December 4, 1917, when his resignation was accepted and he entered the U.S. Army as a private.


Edmund P. Ellis, Captain, Engineers, U.S. Army

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a cartographer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

He was commissioned Captain in the Engineers, and on October 6, 1917, was ordered to Camp Devens, Mass., when he was attached to the 25th Engineers. On October 31, he sailed for France with the 29th Engineers, to which he had been transferred and on December 1st he was stationed as Langres on duty at the Base Printing Plant of the U.S. Army, where he remained until October, 1918. From October 6, 1918, to January 20, 1919, he was stationed at G-2-C, 2nd Army at Toul.

G-2-C (Intelligence Section, Topographic Division) was a part of the General Staff and a similar organization was attached to the staff of the 1st and 2nd armies. The 29th Engineers was assigned to G-2 and, in addition to carrying on all the sound and flash ranging, it furnished the commissioned and enlisted personnel for practically all the surveying and mapping operations of the American forces in France. Complete map printing plants were maintained at General Headquarters and the Headquarters of each Army. Mobile printing outfits (photographic and lithographic equipment mounted on large trucks) were attached to each Corps and several of the Divisions.

Very few cartographers and map draftsman could be found in the American Army and it was necessary to train men for these positions. This was an important part of the work at the Base Printing Plant, and for a considerable period was under the direct supervision of Capt. Ellis. About 160 drafts-men were trained in this school and assigned to the outfits noted above.

While at Toul in the Headquarters of the 2nd Army, he had charge of the map and general drafting with the exception of air photograph restitution.
He sailed from France for the United States on February 5, 1919, was honorably discharged form the U.S. Army at Washington, D.C., on March 7, 1919, and reinstated in the Coast and Geodetic Survey on March 8, 1919.

Francis G. Engle, Lieutenant, U.S.N.R.F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer.

On October 6, 1917, he was enrolled as Lieutenant in the U. S. Navy Reserve Force, effective September 24, 1917. His original assignment was to continue duty on board the U. S. S. SURVEYOR, the fitting out for overseas duty at the Norfolk Navy Yard, under the command of Lieutenant F. H. Hardy, U.S.N.R.F (Later Lieutenant Commander).

On November 12, 1917, he was detached from the SURVEYOR and ordered to duty on the U.S.S. BACHE, where he was assigned as Executive officer, under Lieutenant P.C. Whitney (later Lieutenant Commander) U.S.N.R.F., Commanding. The BACHE at that time was being fitted out and armed at the Norfolk Navy Yard for guardship duty on the Atlantic Coast of the United States.

On January 5, 1918, by orders from the Bureau of Navigation of the Navy Department, he relieved Lieutenant P. C. Whitney of the command of the BACHE. The Steamer having been equipped for patrol duty by the mounting of two three-pounder, semi-automatic guns and assigned to Squadron Five of the vessels of the Fifth Naval District left the Norfolk Navy Yard on January 15, 1918, and was thereafter continually engaged on patrol and guardship duty off the Chesapeake Bay entrance. This duty consisted of identifying all vessels entering and leaving the bay, enforcing the regulations, covering defensive sea areas and examining incoming neutral vessels.

On November 16, 1918, Lieutenant Engle, upon his own request for higher duties, was relieved from the command of the BACHE and was transferred to the Naval Auxiliary Reserve Headquarters, for further assignment to the Naval Overseas Transport Service.

On December 24, 1918, he was ordered to duty as recorder of a board of investigation of the Naval Overseas Transport Service and continued upon this duty until relieved from active service in the U.S. Navy on March 10, 1919. On the following day he returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


J. B. Farrow, Quartermaster, first class, U.S.N.R.F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer SURVEYOR to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a Quartermaster on the SURVEYOR.


A. G. Ferguson, Seaman, U. S. Navy,

Served as a hand with one of the parties operated by the Division of Geodesy of the Coast and Geodetic Survey until June 15, 1918, when he separated from the party and entered the U.S. Navy.


W. R. Fleetwood, Seaman, U. S. N. R. F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer ISIS to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a seaman on the ISIS.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Seaman in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and he served on the U.S.S. ISIS, but the length of his service is not known at this office, as he did not return to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Bobby O. Floyd, Wardroom Cook, U.S.N.R.F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer ISIS to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a cook on the ISIS.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Wardroom Cook in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and served on the U.S.S. ISIS from that date until April 25, 1919, when he was returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Edward F. Foxhall, Ship’s Cook, first class, U.S.N.R.F.,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred with the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer BACHE to the service and jurisdiction of the Navy Department. Previous to his transfer he was a cook on the BACHE

Effective September 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Ship’s Cook, first class in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force and he served on the U.S.S. BACHE from that date until June 20, 1919, when he was returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Burt C. Freeman, First Lieutenant C.A.R.C., U. S. Army,
On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer, he was with the Coast and Geodetic Survey, as a commissioned Junior Hydrographic and Geodetic Engineer.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was commissioned First Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Corps of the U.S. Army. He was first assigned to the Fourth Training Company of the Coast Artillery at Fort Monroe, Va., and in February, 1918, after completing his course at the school, he was assigned to the 66th Artillery, C.A.C. stationed at Fort Constitution, N.H.

Detailed information relating to his war activities are not on file in the office, but on October 8, 1918, information was received that he was at that time Orientation Officer with the American Expeditionary Force in France.

He was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army on February 11, 1919, and on the same date resigned from the Coast and Geodetic Survey.


Benjamin Friedenberg, Physically disqualified for service,

In October, 1917, he was drafted for service in the U.S. Army, but claimed exemption on account of his being a Deck Officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey and his right for a direct transfer as an officer to one of the military forces of the United States.

After being drafted, however, he appeared before a medical examination board of the U.S. Army and was rejected for service on account of being slightly underweight. The fact of his having been rejected on account of physical disability prevented his being recommended for a regular transfer.


Benjamin Galos, Second Lieutenant C.A.R.F., U. S. Army,

On September 24, 1917, by Executive Order 2707, he was transferred to the service and jurisdiction of the War Department. Previous to his transfer he was a commissioned officer in the Coast and Geodetic Survey with the rank of Aid.

Effective September 24, 1917, he was enrolled as Second Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Reserve Force of the U.S. Army. He was first assigned to the training camp at Fort Monroe, Va., and in January, 1918, he was transferred to Fort Totten, N.Y.

On May 16, 1918, he was discharged from the U.S. Army and effective the same date, he was separated from the Coast and Geodetic Survey by the direction of the President of the United States.

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