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Following the announcement by the White House that H. Arnold Karo had been appointed Directorpicture of h. arnold karo of the Coast and Geodetic Survey by President Eisenhower, with the rank of Rear Admiral, the oath of office was administered to him in the Office of the Secretary of Commerce on Wednesday morning, August 17, 1955, by Assistant Secretary of Commerce Teetor.

Admiral Karo was born on December 24, 1903, in Lyons, Nebraska. He received his education at the elementary high schools of Lyons and graduated from the University of Nebraska, with the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. Immediately following his graduation he entered on duty in the Coast and Geodetic Survey and has advanced successively through the ranks from Ensign to his present position.

During his long and notable career, Admiral Karo has spent 22 years at sea aboard the Bureau's vessels engaged on surveying the coastal waters along the Atlantic coast, in the Gulf of Mexico, along the Pacific Coast in Alaska, and in the Philippine Islands. His various shipboard assignments have included Commanding Officer of the Ships WESTDAHL, LYDONIA, FATHOMER, SURVEYOR, and EXPLORER.

In 1941, while commanding the LYDONIA, he received a commendation from the Governor of the Leeward Islands for the excellent cooperation and goodwill maintained during his tour of duty in those islands of the West Indies.

In 1950, while commanding the EXPLORER, he was commended by the Secretary for aiding in the rescue of a severely injured Eskimo in a remote area of Alaska.

During World War II Admiral Karo was transferred by Executive Order from the Coast and Geodetic Survey to the service and jurisdiction of the U.S. Army Air Forces where he held various assignments. Beginning in June 1943 he was assigned for more than 2 years as Commanding Officer of the Aeronautical Chart Plant in St. Louis, Missouri. At that time the plant had just been established and was not yet in full operation. As a result of Admiral Karo's administration and guidance outstanding achievements were accomplished in organizing the plant, and today it is recognized as being among the most important map reproduction plants in the world. He received special commendations from the Commanding General of the Air Force and members of the Air Staff for the work completed under his command.

During the summer of 1951 Admiral Karo was the Bureau's representative at the British Commonwealth Survey Officer's Conference in London, England, where he conferred with the leading European hydrographic officials concerning surveying and charting problems of mutual interest.

Admiral Karo was selected by the Secretary of Commerce as one of the two Department of Commerce participants in the 1954-1956 course of study at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces at Fort McNair, Washington, D.C., from which he recently graduated. He prepared an extensive analysis of the present status of World Mapping. This comprehensive 100-page paper, with 12 status maps printed in color, was reproduced and distributed to various organizations and agencies interested in this subject.

Prior to his appointment as Director of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, Admiral Karo served for the past 4 years as Chief of the Chart Division with the rank of Captain. Under his leadership the total number of charts printed has increased to over 40,000,000 copies per year; a rate of production greater than achieved during World War II. As head of this division, he was responsible for the production and distribution of all nautical and aeronautical charts issued by the Bureau for the use of the Merchant Marine, civil aviation, and the Armed Forces; the compilation of a number of related publications; and the operation of the Bureau's reproduction plant.

Admiral Karo is a member of the United States Naval Institute; American Society of Photogrammetry; Society of American Military Engineers; Sigma Xi; Sigma Tau; Masons; and American Congress on Surveying and Mapping. He is representative of the latter organization of the National Research Council.

Admiral Karo resides at 6307 Kirby Road, Bethesda, Maryland with his wife and two children, Douglas Paul and Kathryn Rosalie. His eldest son, Arnold M. Karo, graduated from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1952 in physical chemistry, with the degree Doctor of Philosophy. He is now engaged on a special research project at M.I.T.

Rear Admiral H. Arnold Karo, Director of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, United States Department of Commerce, was recently appointed by the President as the Coast and Geodetic Survey member of the Mississippi River Commission. The Presidential appointment was confirmed by the United States Senate on July 26, 1956.

As one of the seven members of this important Commission, Admiral Karo will collaborate in various matters concerning navigation and flood control on the Mississippi River and certain major tributaries. The Commission is responsible for topographic, hydrographic, and hydrometrical surveys of the river and its tributaries, and for the planning and programming required to correct, permanently locate, and deepen the channel, and protect the banks of the Mississippi River. Other duties include improvement of the river to promote ease of navigation, prevent destructive floods, promote and facilitate commerce, trade, and the postal service.

Admiral Karo's long years of service with the Coast and Geodetic Survey provide an excellent background for carrying on this important new assignment. Prior to his appointment as Director of the Bureau about 1 year ago, he saw 22 years of sea duty aboard various ships engaged in surveying the waters of Alaska, the Philippines and along the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf Coasts of the United States. He commanded the largest ships of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Fleet.

During World War II Admiral Karo was transferred from the Coast and Geodetic Survey to duty with the United States Army Air Forces. He held various assignments with the Air Forces and beginning in June 1943 served for more than 2 years as Commanding Officer of the Aeronautical Plant, St. Louis, Missouri. As a result of Admiral Karo's administration and guidance outstanding achievements were accomplished in organizing the plant which is recognized as being among the most important map production plants in the world. Special commendations by the Commanding General of the Air Force and members of the Air Force staff were received for work completed under his command.

Admiral Karo completed the resident course of 1954 - 1955 at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, Fort Lesley J. McNair. In the successful completion of this course he prepared, as his term paper, a comprehensive study of World Mapping, which is recognized as an authorative digest of the present scope of surveying and mapping throughout the world. Admiral Karo is the first vice president of the Society of American Military Engineers and is a member of the U.S. Naval Institute, American Society of Photogrammetry and the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping. He is also a member of the National Honorary Scientific Society, Sigma Xi, and the National Honorary Engineering Society, Sigma Tau.

Admiral Karo was born in Lyons, Nebraska, December 24, 1903, where he attended elementary and high schools. He was graduated from the University of Nebraska in June 1923 with the degree Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. His mother Mrs. P.A. Karo, Sr., now resides in Lyons, Nebraska.

Admiral Karo makes his home at 6307 Kirby Road, Bethesda, Maryland, with his wife and two children, Douglas Paul and Kathryn Rosalie. His eldest son, Arnold M. Karo, received his Ph.D. in 1952 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in physical chemistry and is now engaged on a special research project at M.I.T.

Meet the Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel H. Arnold Karo. His friendly unassuming manner belies his unique and extremely interesting career. Colonel Karo was born on Christmas Eve, 1903, in Lyons, Nebraska. He attended the University of Nebraska and graduated in 1923 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering.

Interested in a career of government service and one which promised adventure and excitement, Colonel Karo took a special Civil Service examination and entered the service of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey of the Department of Commerce on June 25, 1923. He served continuously with the Survey and had attained the rank of Lieutenant Commander, when, on February 24, 1942, he was transferred to the Army Air Corps with the rank of Major by Executive Order of the President.

During his 17 years at sea, Colonel Karo spent 5 years in the Philippines, 6 years in Alaska and the Aleutians, and divided the remainder among the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean Sea, and the east and west coasts of the U.S. He has been in command of the U.S.S. FATHOMER in the Philippines, the U.S.S. WESTDAHL in Alaska, and the U.S.S. LYDONIA on the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean. The purpose of these voyages and explorations was to make hydrographic surveys, triangulation control, topographic surveys of the shorelines and adjacent areas, take soundings to determine the depth of water, and to locate dangers to navigation and chart them for the safety of future voyagers.

He has also been engaged on special earthquake investigation work in California and triangulation control for the Alaska-Canada boundary. At the time of our entry into World War II, he was in charge of the Norfolk, Virginia office of the U.S C&GS.

From a scientific viewpoint, Colonel Karo considers his surveys of the Glacier Bay region the most interesting. This area represents the closest approach that the world now has to the ice age.

While in the Philippines, Colonel Karo spent 2 years among the Moro natives, who comprise about 5/8 of the population of the Sulu Archipelago. These natives are, strangely, enough Mohammedans, and are a fierce, somewhat war-like race, although possessing a large amount of personal integrity. They are renowned for their use of the "barong," a large curved blade with razor-sharp edge, with which they quarter their victims. As a trinket of his travels, Colonel Karo was once presented with a barong by the Governor of Sulu Province. Incidentally, that little instrument had been used by an outlaw who had killed six persons with it before he himself was killed by the Philippine Constabulary. As might be guessed, the Moros do not take readily to civilization and it is doubtful if the Japanese have succeeded in subjugating them.

Colonel Karo has eaten monkey and wild bear steaks which he shot in the Philippines, done deep sea fishing and giant lobster hunting in the Caribbean, and hunted bears and deer in Alaska.

The most enjoyable time of his career was the fall and winter of 1940-1941, which was spent surveying a site for a naval base at Antigua, British West Indies. This was one of the bases obtained in the destroyer-swap deal with Great Britain. The climate was delightful and the inhabitants were very friendly and hospitable. One of the highlights of this tour of duty was an inspection of the base site made by President Roosevelt.

After his transfer to the Air Corps, Colonel Karo was assigned to the First Mapping Group at Bolling Field, D.C., then transferred to the Office of the Director of Photography, Maps and Charts, Hq., AAF, where he served until July 1943, when he assumed command of the Aeronautical Chart Plant.

Looking back over a career of outstanding achievements, Colonel Karo regards his command of the Aeronautical Chart Plant as one of the high spots as the contribution of the ACP to the war effort is without parallel. He stated, "Our fliers must have accurate charts and the Aeronautical Chart Service is seeing that they get them."

Vice Admiral H. Arnold Karo, government administrator, engineer, scientist, author, and lecturer has served as Deputy Administrator of the Environmental Science Services Administration since July 13, 1965. From August 1955 to July 12, 1965, Admiral Karo served as Director of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. During this period of almost 10 years, Admiral Karo guided the Bureau's program in support of commerce, business, industry, and engineering; in contributing to the defense of the Nation; and in making substantial contributions to the national scientific posture of the United States.

Born December 24, 1903, in Lyons, Nebraska, where he attended elementary and high schools, Admiral Karo was graduated from the University of Nebraska with the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering in 1923. He immediately entered on duty with the Survey where he has spent nearly 42 years of his professional career. At ceremonies held in February 1958 at Union College, the honorary degree of Doctor of Science was conferred upon Admiral Karo in recognition of his international leadership in promoting scientific pursuits in surveying and charting the national domain. He is also a graduate of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces.

Admiral Karo served for more than 3 years as Chairman of the Committee on Cartography, National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences, which advised the State Department in matters concerning international cartography. He served as Chairman of the United States delegation to the 2nd United Nations Regional Cartographic Conference for Asia and the Far East held in Tokyo, Japan in 1958, and also headed the U.S. delegation to the 3rd United Nations Cartographic Conference held in Bangkok, Thailand in 1961. He represented the U.S. at the British Commonwealth Survey Officers Conferences held at London, England, in July 1951, and at Cambridge, England, in August 1959, and July 1963. He participated in September 1959 as a member of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping delegation at the Cracow, Poland conference of the International Federation of Surveyors. In February 1963, he served as the United States representative for geodesy and mapping at the United National Conference on the Application of Science and Technology for the Benefit of the Less Developed Areas, at Geneva, Switzerland. In early July 1963, he served as Chairman of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Regional Cartographic Conference for Africa, held a Nairobi, Kenya. He was a member of the U.S. delegation to the 4th United Nations Cartographic Conference for Asia and the Far East held in Manila, Republic of the Philippines, November to December 1964. He represented the Environment Science Services Administration at the Governor's Conference on Oceanography and Astronautics, held in Hawaii, September 1965.

Admiral Karo served as the 1957 National President of the Society of American Military Engineers. He is also past-President of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping, Vice President of the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association, and Department of Commerce member of the Federal Council's Interagency Committee on Oceanography. He was a member of the United States delegation to the oceanographic meeting held in Copenhagen in July 1960, where the foundation was laid for the formation of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) in UNESCO. He has been a member of the U.S. delegation to meetings of the IOC and has played a significant role in the development and advancement of our national and international oceanographic program. As the Coast and Geodetic Survey member of the Mississippi River Commission, Admiral Karo played an important part in furthering the national program of developing and improving one of the great waterways of the world and its tributaries.

Admiral Karo's long years of service in the Coast and Geodetic Survey have included over 22 years of sea duty aboard various ships engaged in surveying and charting the waters of Alaska, the Philippines, the Caribbean, and along the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf Coasts of the United States. He has commanded the major ships of the Survey fleet. In 1941, while serving as Commanding Officer of the Ship LYDONIA, Admiral Karo received a commendation from the Governor of the Leeward Islands for the excellent cooperation and good will maintained during his tour of duty in these islands of the West Indies.

During World War II he was transferred to duty with the U.S. Army Air Forces. He held various assignments, including Commanding Officer, beginning in 1943, of the Air Forces Aeronautical Chart Plant at St. Louis, Missouri, with the rank of Colonel, which had just been activated. As a result of Admiral Karo's administration and guidance, outstanding achievements were accomplished in organizing the plant which today is recognized as being among the most important map reproduction plants in the world. Special commendations by the Commanding General of the Air Forces and members of the Air Staff were received for work completed under his command.

Admiral Karo received special regcognition for his important comprehensive treatise on World Mapping, completed during his course of study at the Industrial College of the Armed Force.

He was awarded the Philippines Legion of Honor, degree of Officer, for eminently meritorious service in the Philippines during two tours of duty there early in his career.

He was awarded the Gold Medal of the Society of American Military Engineers for 1965 in recognition of a decade of exceptionally meritorious service to the S.A.M.E. while Director of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, as President of the Society in 1957, and for his national and international leadership in military engineering, science and technology.

He is a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and a member of the American Geophysical Union, the Cosmos Club of Washington, the U.S. Naval Institute, American Society of Photogrammetry, American Congress on Surveying and Mapping, Society of American Military Engineers, Sigma Xi, Sigma Tau, and the Explorer's Club. He is also a registered professional engineer in the District of Columbia.

Admiral Karo resides at 6307 Kirby Road, Bethesda, Maryland, with his wife and two children, Douglas Paul and Kathryn Rosalie. His eldest son, Arnold M. Karo, received his Ph.D.in 1952 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in physical chemistry.

Paper, 5/25/66

VICE ADMIRAL H. ARNOLD KARO

TO RETIRE FROM ESSA

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND

With the January 1967 retirement of Vice Admiral H. Arnold Karo, former Director of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (1955 to 1965) and now Deputy Administrator of the Environmental Science Services Administration (ESSA), the government will lose the services of one of its most dedicated and able administrators. He is one of the most widely known and respected, both nationally and internationally, Government administrators and experts in the fields of oceanography, cartography, and surveying and mapping.

Admiral Karo has over 43 years of service, over half of which has been spent at sea. Her has a reputation for never ordering any of his men to do a job he would not do himself, and he has traveled from Arctic Alaska to the South Pole, and around the world from east to west, inspecting the operations of the Coast and Geodetic Survey and in participating in international oceanographic, cartographic, surveying and mapping, and other scientific meetings. He has headed the United States Delegations to many of these international meetings. He is known by all foreign associates and students in these various disciplines for his willingness and great interest in exchange of knowledge and the passing on of the expertise of this country for the advancement of all. His friendly and helpful attitude has won for him a host of friends throughout the world.

He became the head of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey at one of the critical points in its 150 year history. Almost single-handedly he was able to lift the Survey out of its lethargy, to give it a transfusion of new vitality and purpose, and to reorient its goals to include basic and applied research and development in the many earth science disciplines in which it had always been re-eminent and to recapture much of that pre-eminence.

The results of this effort speak for itself today in a viable and dynamic research and development program which has produced an increasing number of excellent research papers and reports and such developments as the stable underwater platform (which Woods Hole essentially copied later in their "sea spider,") the geometric-optical system of satellite triangulation including new methods of computation and adjustment, the first successful extensive use of color aerial photography for mapping, the refinement and extensive use of analytical aerial triangulation, the first stereoscopic photography (in color) and micro-contouring of sections of the sea floor, new seismic and geomagnetic instruments, new hydrographic data acquisition and recording systems, ocean current data acquisition systems--the list could go on and on.

Perhaps one of the things he will be most remembered for is his success in upgrading and replacing obsolete and deteriorated capital equipment. Ten new geomagnetic and/or seismological observatories and installations have been built for the C&GS - three replacement and seven new. The worldwide standard seismological network of 120 stations around the world has been virtually completed by the Coast and Geodetic Survey; and extensive research and instrumentation is underway in the earthquake prediction program.

One of the biggest jobs he has so successfully engineered is in the Survey's "New and Replacement Ship Construction Program." After 150 years working without a home of its own for its ships, the acquisition of modern ship base facilities for its fleet of ships--a Pacific Marine Center at Seattle and an Atlantic Marine Center at Norfolk.

He has been directly responsible for the planning and construction of 13 new ships for the Coast Survey; four have been delivered, four or five are expected to be delivered during the balance of this calendar year, and all but one are to be delivered during 1967. The final ship presently under construction contract is scheduled to be delivered in 1968. There is hope that a 14th ship for special current surveys will be authorized this year.

These ships range from the 176-ton RUDE to the 3,800-ton OCEANOGRAPHER, the largest, most completely equipped and extensively automated oceanographic research ship of the United States.

In a way, the OCEANOGRAPHER represents much of Admiral Karo's ideas, ideals, and ambitions. Known during his sea-going days as a frustrated oceanographer because he could not obtain official sanction to devote more sea time and effort to greater oceanographic pursuits and operations, his first action after taking over the helm of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey was to more extensively instrument oceanographically, the Survey's fleet of ships and to establish research and development as a recognized entity. He also instituted a program of advanced oceanographic education for selected officers, sending many officers full time to the universities for advanced oceanographic courses of study.

Much as he takes pride in the overall accomplishments of the Survey during the last 10 or 12 years, it is easy to see that the OCEANOGRAPHER and its sister ship, the DISCOVERER, are his real pride and job. Nor can we blame him. They represent a dream and ambition that has come to full flower (nearly). Karo's heart and soul are wrapped up in his ships. From conception to delivery, his was the motivating force behind these ships.

Those of you who have seen the OCEANOGRAPHER agree that Admiral Karo has every right to be proud. Additional quarters for visiting scientists and for cooperating university professors and students from universities not possessing ships of their own, were provided in the OCEANOGRAPHER and DISCOVERER at Karo's insistence. Cooperation with other agencies and with the scientists of universities and private institutions has always been his long suit. "I have yet to see a program that cannot be reasonably adapted to meet the needs of those genuinely interested in getting a good job of science accomplished," Karo has stated time and again, and the results of the various missions prove his point. On scientific cruises, all bunks are filled, even to the point of "hot sheets" in some instances. This cooperation was extended to foreign scientists on the "Tropical Atlantic" cruise of the EXPLORER and the "International Indian Ocean Expedition" cruise of the PIONEER. Both were eminently successful. Now with quarters expressly provided for these cooperating scientists on the OCEANOGRAPHER and DISCOVERER, and to be provided on all future ships constructed, and the exceptionally large laboratory space on the oceanographic research ships, this cooperation will be expanded.

The Federal Government could well do with more men of Admiral Karo's vision, determination, and administrative ability.

PAPER,?

Date /Place of Birth

December 24, 1903

Lyons, Nebraska

Legal Residence

6307 Kirby Road

Bethesda, Maryland

Marital Status

Married

Arnold M.

Douglas P.

Kathryn R.

Education

University of Nebraska, 1923, B.S. in Civil Engineering

Military Service

Colonel, USAF 1942-45

Present Position

Presidential appointee, Deputy Administrator, Environmental Science Services Administration, Department of Commerce, effective July 13, 1965, with pay and allowance of Vice Admiral.

Experience Prior to Appointment to Present Position

From 1923 to 1950, served on and commanded some of the largest ships of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, advancing from the rank of Ensign to Captain. Service interrupted during 1942 to 1945 by transfer to the USAF. During this time, held posts in the Directorate, Photography, Maps, Charts (1942), and Commanding Officer, Air Force Aeronautical Chart Plant (1943-45.) From 1951 to 1955, was Chief, Chart Division, C&GS. From 1955 to 1965 served, by Presidential appointment, as Director, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, with rank of Rear Admiral.

Honors and Professional Affiliations

Doctor of Science (Honorary,) Union College, Schenectady, N.Y. Sigma Xi

Sigma Tau

Gold Medal (1965) Society of American Military Engineers

Fellow, American Society of Civil Engineers

American Geophysical Union

Cosmos Club of Washington, D.C.

U.S. Naval Institute

American Society o Photogrammetry

American Congress on Surveying and Mapping

Society of American Military Engineers

Explorer's Club

Registered Professional Engineer, D.C.

International Participation

Admiral Karo served for more than 3 years as Chairman of the Committee on Cartography, National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences, which advised the State Department in matters concerning international cartography. He served as Chairman of the United States delegation to the 2nd United Nations Regional Cartographic Conference for Asia and the Far East held in Tokyo in 1958, and also headed the U.S. delegation to the 3rd United Nations Cartographic Conference held in Bangkok in 1961. He represented the United States in the British Commonwealth Survey Officers Conferences held in London, England in July 1951, and in Cambridge, England in August 1959, and July 1963. He participated, in September 1959, as a member of the American Congress in Surveying and Mapping delegation at the Cracow, Poland conference of the International Federation of Surveyors. In February 1963, he served as the United States representative for geodesy and mapping at the United Nations Conference on the Application of Science and Technology for the Benefit of the Less Developed Areas in Geneva, Switzerland. In early July 1963, he served Chairman of the United States delegation to the United Nations Regional Cartographic Conference for Africa, held in Nairobi, Kenya. He was a member of the U.S. delegation to the 4th U.N. Cartographic Conference for Asia and the Far East held in Manila, Republic of the Philippines, November to December 1964. He represented the Environment Science Services Administration at the Governor's Conference on Oceanography and Astronautics, held in Hawaii, September 1965.

He was a member of the United States delegation to the oceanographic meeting held in Copenhagen in July 1960, where the foundation was laid for the formation of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) in UNESCO. He has been a member of the U.S. delegation to meetings of the IOC and has played a significant role in the development and advancement of our national and international oceanographic programs.

PAPER, 5/25/66

Vice Admiral H. Arnold Karo, Deputy Administrator of ESSA since the organization was formed nearly 18 months ago, is retiring after a distinguished career spanning 43-1/2 years.

Admiral Karo is a native of Lyons, Nebraska. He joined the commissioned corps of the Coast and Geodetic Survey immediately following his graduation from the University of Nebraska in 1923. He served aboard 10 different ships for a total of 22 years, and commanded the LYDONIA, DERICKSON, and EXPLORER.

In February 1942, he was transferred to the War Department by Executive Order and became the first Commanding Officer of the USAAF Aeronautical Charting Plant in St. Louis, Missouri. He returned to the Coast and Geodetic Survey in November 1954, and served aboard several Seattle-based ships until November 1950. He was then transferred from command of the EXPLORER to Washington as assistant chief, (and later chief) of the Division of Charts. He attended the Industrial College of the Armed Services in 1954-1955; in August 1955 received an interim appointment as Director, Coast and Geodetic Survey. He served in that post until becoming Deputy Administrator of ESSA in July 1965.

Admiral Karo was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Science in 1958 by Union College. His may other honors and awards include the Philippines Legion of Honor, degree of Officer, and the Gold Medal of the Society of American Military Engineers for 1965. He is a member of numerous scientific, professional and honorary societies.

Admiral and Mrs. Karo and their daughter, Kathryn, were honored at a retirement banquet attended by over 200 friends and associates on December 8, 1966.

In a short speech he stated some of the personal principles that he has followed during his career. They are worth repeating.

1. Love of country and steadfast devotion to duty and to the public service.

2. Personal integrity--integrity and belief in one's self, one's service, and one's country.

3. The search for excellence--the desire to excel, not for personal glory, but to improve the quality of public service.

4. Courage to stand for principles and not to compromise under pressure. By this I do not mean to the point of obstinacy or contentiousness, although I suspect I have been accused of that. But rather as Theodore Roosevelt once said "on the Ten Commandments and the Sermon on the Mount, uncompromising rigidity; on all else the widest tolerance."

5. Never to order an assignment or duty for another you will not undertake yourself.

6. Always be alert to new possibilities and for new and better ways of doing things.

December 23,1903 - May 23, 1986

Vice Admiral Henry Arnold Karo, NOAA (Retired) was born December 24, 1903, in Lyons, Nebraska. He graduated from the University of Nebraska in 1923 with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering. Following his graduation, he was appointed as Deck Officer to the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (now the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and on February 4, 1924, was commissioned as Ensign.

During Admiral Karo's 43-year career his assignments included 22 years aboard the following ships: the SURVEYOR as Junior Officer and later as Executive Officer; the FATHOMER as Second Officer, and later as Executive Officer, and Commanding Officer; the BACHE, the PIONEER, the GUIDE, the DISCOVERER, the WESTDAHL as Commanding Officer; the LYDONIA as Commanding Officer; the EXPLORER as Executive Officer and Commanding officer; and the DERICKSON as Commanding Officer. His other assignments included Chief of Party for Triangulation, Officer in Charge for the Norfolk Processing Office, Assistant Chief and Chief in the Division of Charts; and attending the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. He served as Director of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey from August 13, 1955, until the formation of the U.S. Environmental Science Services Administration; at that time he was appointed as Deputy Administrator. He served in that position until his retirement on January 1, 1967. After his retirement Admiral Karo served as Expedition Director for ESSA's year-long Global Scientific Expedition of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey's Ship OCEANOGRAPHER. As a result of this expedition, a close-working association among distinguished scientists from 17 nations continues today.

During World War II he was transferred to the U.S. Army Air Force where he served as Commanding Officer for the Air Force Aeronautical Chart Center in St. Louis, producing charts for worldwide use during the war. He was awarded the World War II Victory Medal, the American Campaign Medal and the Pacific War Zone Ribbon.

Admiral Karo was awarded the Philippines Legion of Honor for meritorious services to the Philippines in the 1920's and 1930's. He also received honorary Doctor of Science Degrees from the University of Nebraska and from Union College.

He is survived by his wife, Elsie, two sons, Arnold M. and Douglas P.; one daughter, Kathryn R., and two grandchildren.


THE BUZZARD, 8/26/1955
THE BUZZARD, 8/24/1956

ACP BULLETIN, Vol. 1, No. 4, 9/2/1944
ESSA BULLETIN, Vol. 1, No. 6, 1/3/1967
NOAA CORPS BULLETIN, 6/1/1986


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